Getac's full rugged A140 tablet was on display inside a patrol vehicle. - PHOTO: Wayne Parham

Getac's full rugged A140 tablet was on display inside a patrol vehicle.

PHOTO: Wayne Parham

There were major announcements, such as Oracle’s entrance into the law enforcement market, at the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) Annual Conference and Exposition in Dallas, TX, but there was so much more to see. While walking the aisles this week I found everything from ALPR systems and new body-worn cameras to apparel, and nearly anything else that would help an officer or a department.

I was able to spend a little time with Mike McMahon, president of Getac North America, and learned about the company’s new 4K Rugged Body-Worn Camera. It’s small and ready to capture 4K video, however, the resolution can be dialed down to allow departments to better manage the volume of data to be stored. McMahon says that when the highest resolution is needed, such as with SWAT officers making an entry, the 4K capabilities are an asset. James Murphy, also of Getac, showed me the versatility of the fully rugged A140 tablet in, and out, of a patrol vehicle. The versatility was really impressive.

At the opposite end of the expo, a different kind of tech caught my eye. Although there were several automatic defibrillators (AEDs) at the Stryker booth, they also had the Lucas 3 displayed. The Lucas 3 is a chest compression system. During extended CPR, Lucas 3 can take over for first responders and continue compressions while they tend to other medical needs. It never gets tired, it never changes pace, and it is very portable. Plus, it is adjustable to fit all body types.

Stryker demonstrated the Lucas 3 chest compression system alongside several AEDs. - PHOTO: Wayne Parham

Stryker demonstrated the Lucas 3 chest compression system alongside several AEDs.

PHOTO: Wayne Parham

Walking by the Otis Technology booth, I noticed the person on hand was being generous. Sure, the new Law Enforcement Ultimate Weapons Maintenance Kit was on display, but he was also handing out free .40-caliber and 45 Auto Otis Ripcord pull-through bore cleaners. That was a nice gesture and hopefully chiefs and other officers took advantage of the offering.

I admit I am a flashlight guy, but I knew little about Fenix Lighting. Well, that changed quickly when I started talking to Patrick Cooper, vice president of sales. He really believes in what he preaches. But, when you talk about something like Fenix’s TK20R V2.0 it is hard to argue against a rechargeable light that offers a run time exceeding three hours at 1,000 lumens. Even on turbo, 1,600 lumens, the run time is close to three hours, just 10 minutes shy.

At the Recon Power Bikes booth, several things caught my eye. The company’s Interceptor model was decked out with lights and a new Two-Lanes LPR mounted on the handlebar. The system can read license plates passing at a pretty high rate of speed, up to 200 mph I was told. Now you might not be able to pursue a 200-mph suspect by bike, but the Interceptor does have a top speed of 30 mph, a range of 50 miles per charge, and is driven by a 1,000-watt electric motor. Combining that with the LPR camera system makes it a very stealthy, portable, way to read plates.

Recon Power Bikes Interceptor model now has more capability with a Two-Lanes LPR. - PHOTO: Wayne Parham

Recon Power Bikes Interceptor model now has more capability with a Two-Lanes LPR.

PHOTO: Wayne Parham

Over at the Otto Communications booth, things have really gotten small. The new Covert Surveillance Kit is tiny and described by the company as “Practically invisible to the casual observer.” Well, I would have to agree with that statement after seeing it in person. There is no need to raise the microphone or PTT to your mouth to send a transmission. The microphone sits on the PTT and can be fastened to a pocket or lapel to activate inconspicuously.

Otto showcased the new Covert Surveillance Kit. - PHOTO: Wayne Parham

Otto showcased the new Covert Surveillance Kit.

PHOTO: Wayne Parham

Sometimes seeing a product in person does it far more justice than just looking at a two-dimensional image. Well, that’s the case with both Traka’s key management and equipment management solutions. Keys are secured to the Traka iFob, a nickel-plated brass tube that enables the keys to be locked in place while also identifying them to the system. You can’t put keys back in the wrong spot, the system won’t allow that. Both products, whether a key locker or an equipment locker, will track when an officer removes an item and replaces the same item. If they officer does not return keys, or items, at the specified time, alerts are sent out.

Also at IACP 2022, Fechheimer introduced CORE S.T.A.T, a new part of the Flying Cross line of duty apparel. The CORE S.T.A.T. shirts and pants are made from a modern polyester and spandex blend and are treated with a durable water-resistant finish. The line is designed to provide officers with uniforms that flex, stretch, and allow a wide range of motion.

 

Author

Wayne Parham
Wayne Parham

Senior Editor

Wayne Parham is Senior Editor at POLICE Magazine and PoliceMag.com and has more than three decades of experience covering public safety and government.

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Wayne Parham is Senior Editor at POLICE Magazine and PoliceMag.com and has more than three decades of experience covering public safety and government.

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