Photo courtesy of Victory Motorcycles.

Photo courtesy of Victory Motorcycles.

Stealth police vehicles do wonders for traffic enforcement. Scofflaws often recognize the pursuing officer just when the officer lights up the speeder or drunk driver. This can often reduce the number of pursuits and limit their duration because the violator doesn't have as much time to flee.

Stealth patrol cars have been widely used in law enforcement. As one example, the Houston Police Department's Traffic Enforcement Unit uses stealth Chevrolet Camaros and Dodge Chargers. The HPD painted the cars in all white and all black with ghosted lettering.

Stealth motorcycles may be less common, but that may be changing. Victory Motorcycles has introduced a stealth version of their Commander I police motorcycle. The cycle's black-out paint scheme gives it a sleeker, less aggresive look. The company uses satin charcoal black flake paint that can be easily wiped clean. Areas of the bike that would normaly show chrome also get the black-out treatment.

Reflective decals show "POLICE" on the batwing faring, on the saddle bags, and at the rear of the bike on the "top box." Stealth Code 3 lighting rounds out the package.

The bike, which is powered by a 106cc V-twin engine that generates 97 hp, tones down the non-stealth version's in-your-face look and allows officers to better monitor traffic without sticking out, company rep Mike Schultz tells PoliceMag.com.

The Victory Commander offers several officer safety features and is designed with what the company calls "integrated tip-over protection." The bike is constructed to help keep it from falling on its side. The bike will fall no further than 34 degrees and keeps its wheels on the roadway. The cycle also offers a heel-to-toe shifter with an easier path to neutral, a helmet lock, and saddle bags that can accommodate an M-4 rifle and two additional magazines.

So far, four agencies have opted for the stealth Commander I, including the Huntington Park (Calif.) Police Department, Johnson County (Kan.) Sheriff's Office, Laredo (Texas) Police Department, and Marana (Ariz.) Police Department.

Author

Paul Clinton
Paul Clinton

Web Editor

As the POLICE Web editor, Paul Clinton contributes posts about patrol cars, motorcycles, and other police vehicles. He previously wrote about automotive electronics as managing editor of Mobile Electronics. Prior to that, he was an award-winning newspaper reporter.

View Bio

As the POLICE Web editor, Paul Clinton contributes posts about patrol cars, motorcycles, and other police vehicles. He previously wrote about automotive electronics as managing editor of Mobile Electronics. Prior to that, he was an award-winning newspaper reporter.

View Bio
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