In recent days I've been thinking about the language that we use in law enforcement, not just the words we say daily, but also the words we seldom get to say. Here's a look at some words and phrases that all cops would like to be able to say more often or should say more often to make their jobs easier.

1. "I'm sorry"

I know...I know...John Wayne once said, "Never say you're sorry." I love the Duke, but I call bullshit. If you've screwed up, then try to make amends on the matter. By the same token, if the transgression is relatively minor and your apology is not accepted, then screw the SOB.

2. "Thanks"

Thanks for not giving me trouble because I gave you a ticket. Thanks for not making a difficult call more so. Thanks for not insulting my intelligence.

3. "Good job"

We all get tired of the breast-beating, self-congratulatory types. Perhaps they wouldn't be so damned determined to get some acknowledgement if we just gave them some of our own initiative. I could be wrong, though.

4. "You're welcome"

Mostly unnecessary because people don't say "thank you" to us very often.

5. "Will somebody coordinate this call for me?"

Maybe the guy just got off training, or is sitting on the john, or newly assigned to a patrol beat that he's unfamiliar with. Whatever the reason, he takes too long to get the coordination ball rolling.

If you have any others, please feel free to add them below.

Now here's some other stuff that's worth thinking about.

Was St. Petersburg PD's Decision to Go After Fugitive in Attic the Safest Choice? 

Maybe not. If you've not read my cover story on attic searches, please go here.

The Highway is No Place to be High

Autopsies show that nearly one in every five automobile drivers who were killed in highway crashes during 2009 had drugs in their systems, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said in a report that includes state-by-state statistics.

Heads-Up Cop Key To Major Human Smuggling Ring Bust in Arizona

Per officials the investigation began more than a year ago when an alert police officer, conducting a routine patrol check of a U-Haul rental-storage facility, noticed a number of trucks and vans with tinted windows that appeared to have reinforced shock absorbers, which are "telltale signs" of vehicles being used for smuggling.

Supreme Court: There's No Right to be Paroled

My take: We'd have to worry less about paroling dirtbags if we prioritized who we were going to house. I've made no secret about being sympathetic to decriminalizing certain substances, particularly as it would free up room for those criminals intent on victimizing others. Like it or not, the way the economy and cut-backs are going, this is one idea that might yet get traction.

And some funny stuff.

Polish Police Push Cars to Simulate Pursuit (and to save gas):

This could single-handedly resurrect many bad jokes from the '70s.

Sounds Like a Sting Operation

No cop ever volunteers for this kind of sting.

Author

Dean Scoville
Dean Scoville

Associate Editor

Former associate editor of Police Magazine and a retired patrol supervisor and investigator with the Los Angeles Sheriff's Department, Sgt. Dean Scoville has received multiple awards for government service.

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Former associate editor of Police Magazine and a retired patrol supervisor and investigator with the Los Angeles Sheriff's Department, Sgt. Dean Scoville has received multiple awards for government service.

View Bio
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