Photo by Mark W. Clark.

Photo by Mark W. Clark.

One of the mottos of the International Law Enforcement Educators and Trainers Association (ILEETA) is "When safety is taken for granted, take injury for granted." The following is a condensed version of ILEETA's training safety guidelines.

  1. The instructor sets the pace and intensity.
  2. All persons are to be searched entering the training area. Guns, knives, ammo, TASERs, OC, and any other hazard should be removed and locked up. Guns should be unloaded.
  3. Before the training begins students are to be searched by themselves, by a training partner, and by a safety officer. This is to be repeated after all breaks.
  4. Be sure to retrieve and reload your weapon at end of training. You do not want to go on duty with a Blue Gun in your holster.
  5. Leave no firearm in your vehicle.
  6. Use simulated or replica guns whenever possible.
  7. When using unloaded weapons, check and recheck by multiple officers, especially after breaks. Then tape weapon closed to prevent loading.
  8. Use mats for takedowns.
  9. No horseplay or off-script demonstrations will be tolerated.
  10. Advise instructor and training partner of any preexisting injury or condition. Injury should be marked with red wrist band.
  11. Do not spray inert OC canister closer than four feet into face to prevent eye injury.
  12. Safety officers can stop training at any time.
  13. Remove jewelry.
  14. Students experiencing pain during technique can end it by saying "break."

Related:

Training Accidents

The Tragedy of Training Accidents

Smaller Departments Require Greater Training Needs

The Next Generation Firing Range

Training Sims Help Officers Use Appropriate Force

A Full-Scale Faux City for Force-on-Force Training

Author

David Griffith

David Griffith has been editor of POLICE Magazine since December 2001. He brings more than 25 years of experience on magazines and newspapers to POLICE. A Maggie award-winning journalist, his byline has appeared on hundreds of articles in POLICE and other national magazines.

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David Griffith has been editor of POLICE Magazine since December 2001. He brings more than 25 years of experience on magazines and newspapers to POLICE. A Maggie award-winning journalist, his byline has appeared on hundreds of articles in POLICE and other national magazines.

View Bio
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