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U.S. Supreme Court Cases

Supreme Court Rules Officers Can’t be Sued for Miranda Violations

Justice Samuel Alito wrote in his majority opinion that “a violation of Miranda is not itself a violation of the Fifth Amendment” and “we see no justification for expanding Miranda to confer a right to sue” under the federal law known as Section 1983.

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Point of Law: SCOTUS’ Ruling on Malicious Prosecution

What does the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Thompson v Clark mean for you.

Point of Law: Recent Rulings on Exigency

A 2021 case involving an Iowa police department reveals how the Supreme Court is refining the exigent circumstances exemption.

Supreme Court Grants Qualified Immunity to Officers in 2 Cases

The court overturned the lower-court decisions without ordering full briefing and argument, a sign it did not see them as close calls. There were no dissents.

Supreme Court Rules Against Officer in Warrantless Entry Over Misdemeanor

Writing for the unanimous court, Justice Elena Kagan said police had no right to enter the man's home without a warrant for such a trivial offense.

Supreme Court Rules Tribal Police Can Detain Non-Natives who Violate State or Federal Laws

The unanimous ruling overturned lower courts that said a Crow police officer should not have held a nontribal member who was found to have drugs and weapons in his truck.

Supreme Court Hearing Case on When Officers Can Enter Home Without Warrant

The lower courts ruled that police could enter the home and under the so-called the community care-taking exception to the Constitution's warrant requirement. Representing Edward Caniglia, lawyer Shay Dvoretzky said that an exception like that would "eviscerate" the warrant protections of the Fourth Amendment.

Supreme Court Makes It Easier to Sue Police for Excessive Force

The court determined that in order to sue for excessive force under the Fourth Amendment, it is not necessary for a plaintiff to have been physically seized by law enforcement.

Supreme Court Considering Case Involving Jurisdiction of Tribal Police on Public Roads Crossing Reservation Land

Some justices expressed concern about public safety if tribal officers lacked power to stop and detain non-Native Americans. Conservative Justice Clarence Thomas wondered what would happen if an officer encountered a known serial killer.

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SCOTUS Backs Police in Traffic Stops

The Supreme Court said in an 8-1 decision that unless there's reason to believe otherwise, it's common sense for an officer to think the car's owner will be driving.

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