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Point of Law

Recalling Police Use of Force Law—Constitutional Law Crate, Part 1

Attorney Missy O'Linn explains her "Constitutional Law Crate," which she created as 11 flash cards assembled into a cube, or crate, to give officers a way to remember the most imperative information when testifying in court, such as the three levels of force and Graham v. Connor.

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California Deputy to Face Manslaughter Charge in Fatal 2016 OIS

A Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy will face voluntary manslaughter charges for a February 2016 shooting that left 26-year-old Francisco Garcia dead, according to ABC News.

Best of POLICE: Our 12 Most Popular Articles

We're doing a new kind of index in this Buyer's Guide issue in the form of a gallery of our 12 most popular articles based on website visits.

Should I Stay or Should I Go?

If you respond to a call involving a suicidal person who's not endangering anyone else, it might be best to not intervene.

Think Before You Hit Send

What about those text messages and emails that are sent on officers' personal devices? Are they safe from scrutinizing eyes?

Overlooked Legal Nuggets

From time to time, we get a really helpful decision that can make our jobs easier, and yet few people seem to learn about it or realize its significance. Here are 10 such decisions from the U.S. Supreme Court.

Arrest Warrants

Many arrests are made without a warrant, of course. However, where the circumstances permit, "Law enforcement officers may find it wise to seek arrest warrants where practicable to do so." (U.S. v. Watson)

Serving the Search Warrant

Having a warrant does not guarantee that your actions will always be upheld. Every officer participating in the execution of a search warrant should be familiar with the following guidelines.

Consensual Encounters

The well-trained, self-disciplined, smart law enforcement officer first tries a consensual encounter, before resorting to a detention that may or may not win judicial approval.

Under the Microscope After an OIS

If, God forbid, you have to shoot someone on the job, here are some possible consequences you may find yourself enduring for the next several years, even though you may have been completely justified in your use of deadly force.