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Rear Waistband Disarming with Police Krav Maga
Handcuffing Suspects: 3 Techniques

Handcuffing Suspects: 3 Techniques

Too many officers try to handcuff a suspect while he or she is still fighting. Before you can handcuff a suspect, you must obtain control. Here are three techniques for when you're on your own (rear leg sweep), with a partner (rear takedown), or with a group of three or more officers (the swarm). Read our feature, "Closing the Gap," for the full story. Photos by Amaury Murgado.

July 10, 2013

Choke Escapes: 2 Techniques

Choke Escapes: 2 Techniques

If you find yourself against an MMA aficionado, you'll want to know how to get out of a choke hold. View detailed photos showing escape techniques to defend against the rear naked choke and the guillotine choke. Read our full article, "Choke Escapes." Photos by Jimmy Lee.

March 15, 2012

Small Edged Weapons

Small Edged Weapons

Many of the criminals now being released have learned to use small edged weapons in prison. Some of these inmates are very skilled at using these blades to slice and kill. Job one for a police officer is to not get cut and to stop the attack. After viewing these photos, read our full article, "Defending Against Small Edged Weapons."

February 7, 2012

POLICE-TREXPO 2011 In Pictures

POLICE-TREXPO 2011 In Pictures

Attendees to the POLICE-TREXPO 2011 conference in Chantilly, Va., from Aug. 10-12 had the chance to hear Lt. Col. Dave Grossman give the keynote, "The Bulletproof Mind: Psychological and Physiological Preparation for Combat." They were also able to take advantage of a pair of defensive-tactics traing sessions, including Al Giusto's techniques for disarming suspects armed with edged weapons. Range Night included an instructional session from Chris Cerino of "Top Shot" fame.

August 11, 2011

Two Dynamic Takedowns

Two Dynamic Takedowns

An officer must be able to handle a suspect who becomes resistive or combative during a pat-down search. Here are two moves you can use that will help you take him to the ground, so you keep yourself safe and in control of the situation. Read our full article, "Dynamic Takedown Techniques."

July 21, 2011

Gun Grabs: 3 Techniques

Gun Grabs: 3 Techniques

When asked to demonstrate weapon retention, most officers place both hands on their holstered handgun and move their hips violently from side to side. This is a good technique. Here are three additional techniques that can help you keep your duty weapon out of the hands of the bad guy. For the full story, read "Stopping Gun Grabs."

February 1, 2011

Four Safer Strikes

Four Safer Strikes

There are arguments for and against law enforcement officers using closed-hand punches. It can be better to avoid hitting a suspect with your bare knuckles so you don't injure your hands so you can't pull a trigger, hold a baton or continue striking with a broken hand. Here are four safer strikes—palm strike, bottom fist strike, knee strike and elbow strike—when dealing with a violent suspect. Our related article, "Safer Strikes," explains how to avoid bloodborne pathogens.

August 5, 2010

Surviving Edged Weapon Threats

Surviving Edged Weapon Threats

Knowing how to effectively respond to an unexpected knife attack is a crucial officer-safety concern. If a suspect is further than 21 feet, you may be able to fire one or two shots, though you'll want to rotate off line to try to get out of the path of the incoming knife. To survive a deadly knife threat, know your tactics, study concealment, realize capabilities, learn knife fighting and develop basic knife defenses. Photos and captions by Al Abidin.

June 14, 2010

Using Your Foot

Using Your Foot

A swift kick can do wonders in a violent confrontation, but you have to know how to deliver it. Law enforcement agencies equip and train officers with pistols, rifles, shotguns, batons, OC, TASERs, canines, horses, basllistic shields, battering rams, emplty hand self defense, and countless other potentially dangerous law enforcement tools, but may be hesistant when an officer properly and justifiably uses kicks for self-defense or to subdue a suspect. The U.S. Supreme Court held in Graham v. Connor that the reasonableness of an officer's actions must be judged by the circumstances at the time the force is used. It did not restrict of limit the tactics that an officer can employ.

July 10, 2009

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