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Open Wide and Say, "Ahhh"

Open Wide and Say, "Ahhh"

Under what circumstances would the Fourth Amendment allow routine collection of DNA samples upon arrest and booking? A recent Supreme Court decision addressed this issue.

August 5, 2013

SCOTUS Allows DNA Swabs During Arrests

SCOTUS Allows DNA Swabs During Arrests

The 5-4 ruling came in Maryland v. King, where a convicted rapist had argued his Fourth Amendment privacy rights were violated when police used DNA to connect him to an earlier crime.

June 3, 2013

Video: Calif. Cops TASER Domestic Suspect In Home

Video: Calif. Cops TASER Domestic Suspect In Home

Cotati (Calif.) Police officers entered the home of a military veteran after a neighbor called 911 Friday to report a domestic dispute. The veteran released his video of the episode that he says shows police improperly entered his home.

May 16, 2013

Ariz. Officers Claim Privacy Violation In DNA Lawsuit
DNA Case Heads To U.S. Supreme Court

DNA Case Heads To U.S. Supreme Court

A convicted rapist is challenging a Maryland law that allows police to take a DNA sample from violent suspects, arguing his Fourth Amendment privacy rights have been violated.

November 12, 2012

Warrantless Detention Case Heads to Supreme Court
Exigent Entry

Exigent Entry

Warrantless entries are limited to those authorized by consent, probation or parole search conditions, or "exigent circumstances" involving some sort of emergency requiring immediate action. One category of exigency that may justify warrantless entry is the need to prevent the imminent destruction of evidence.

July 7, 2011

Supreme Court Sides With Police on Evidence-Destruction Case
Surveillance Technology: An End to Stakeouts?
SCOTUS To Decide Whether Officers Need Warrant To Conduct Sex Abuse Interviews at School

SCOTUS To Decide Whether Officers Need Warrant To Conduct Sex Abuse Interviews at School

The Supreme Court has agreed to hear Camreta v. Greene, an Oregon case centering on a whether a child protective services caseworker and deputy sheriff violated the Fourth Amendment when they interrogated a child who alleged sexual abuse in a private office at the child's school for two hours without a warrant, exigent circumstances or parental consent.

October 21, 2010

Third Party Consent Searches

One of the "firmly established exceptions" to the warrant requirement for searches and seizures is the "consent exception."

May 1, 2006

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