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Milwaukee PD Makes SIG Sauer P320 Official Duty Pistol
Indiana State Police Adds SIG Sauer P365 as Their Back-Up Duty Firearm
Video: Illinois Police Test New Device that Ensnares Resistive Subject

Video: Illinois Police Test New Device that Ensnares Resistive Subject

Police officers in Illinois are testing a new restraint weapon designed to fire an 8-foot Kevlar tether — at a range of up to 25 feet — that then ensnares resistive subjects in a high-tech lasso. When the device is activated, a 9mm blank propels the rope from the cartridge. The new handheld device — known as the BolaWrap — costs $800 and each tether cartridge costs $30.

August 14, 2018

Illinois Police Test New Device that Ensnares Resistive Subject
North Dakota Police Department Selects the SIG Sauer P320
North Dakota Highway Patrol Adopts SIG Sauer P320
Aldermen Pushing for More Chicago Police to Have Rifles
Detroit Officers Oppose Pat Downs Before Entering Prison
Detroit Chief Says Crime Dropped 12% Because of Legally Armed Citizens

Detroit Chief Says Crime Dropped 12% Because of Legally Armed Citizens

The chief's call to arms, which first came in December, 2013, has been answered by thousands of men and women tired of being victims and eager to reclaim their beleaguered city. In 2014, some new 1,169 handgun permits were issued, while 8,102 guns were registered with Detroit's police department - many to prior permit holders who bought new firearms. So far in 2015, nearly 500 permits have been issued by the department and more than 5,000 guns have been registered.

August 25, 2015

Seven States Arm National Guard Members in Wake of Chattanooga Tragedy

Courts Say LEOs Can Confront Open-carry Advocates

When police arrived, they took the man's gun, and briefly handcuffed him while they questioned him. The man, Johann Deffert, an "open carry" gun advocate, then sued police saying they had violated his constitutional rights. A federal judge disagreed.

June 11, 2015