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Results: 23

How To Lift Fingerprints

As the responding patrol officer it’s your job to properly process the crime scene, including locating, printing, collecting, and documenting all fingerprint evidence on scene — not necessarily an easy task.

February 1, 2007

Going Door to Door

In a major criminal investigation, getting off your ass and knocking on some doors is essential. In fact, it is a crucial element in the early stages of working an unsolved case. The area canvass-knocking on the doors of all the residences surrounding the crime scene-is one of the first tasks a lead detective should have on his lead sheet.

July 1, 2006

The Power of Association

The easiest and most common way associates are used in police investigations is to locate suspects. While this seems like routine information that everyone knows, only a few people put it into practice in each department.

February 1, 2006

Crime Scene Response for the Patrol Officer

Bang for the Buck: How to Make Ballistic Gelatin

Research shows that properly calibrated ordnance gelatin is a highly reliable tissue simulant. The ordnance gelatin used by the FBI is mixed in 20-pound blocks using the following recipe.

June 1, 2004

How To Investigate Cybercrime

Today and every day, thousands of people worldwide are being victimized by computer crime. That’s why just about every major municipal or county law enforcement agency in the United States now has a new breed of detective: the computer crime or “cybercrime” investigator.

November 1, 2003

How to...Open a Cold Case

How to...Open a Cold Case

A few months ago, newspapers around the country covered the arrest of Gerald Mason for a murder that happened when Dwight D. Eisenhower was in the White House. Mason was rousted out of a comfortable life in South Carolina and charged with killing two police officers in the Los Angeles suburb of El Segundo, Calif. In 1957.

May 1, 2003

Picture Perfect in the Eyes of the Court

If you're lucky enough to have an eye­witness to a crime, and your investigation leads to a possible perpetrator, getting a photo ID is often the next logical step. As with everything else you do, there's the wrong way and the court's way.

February 1, 1996

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