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CA Governor Signs Law Allowing Citizens to Refuse to Help Police

New CA Law Will Require Deadly Force to be "Necessary"

Under the new standard, prosecutors can also consider the actions both of officers and of the victim leading up to a deadly encounter, to determine whether the officer acted within the scope of law, policy and training.

August 19, 2019

Controversial Legislation: The California Compromise

California Legislature Passes Bill on De-Escalation, Use of Force Policies

If the bill becomes law, police agencies would have to adhere to statewide requirements that officers be instructed in ways to de-escalate confrontations. Officers would also be required to receive training in dealing with individuals who are homeless, mentally ill, in distress, or under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

May 29, 2019

Tough CA Use-of-Force Legislation Getting Closer to Being Law

Assembly Bill 392, backed by anti-police activists, has been called the toughest standard in the nation for when police can use deadly force. It was written months after Sacramento police shot Stephon Clark, a vehicle burglary suspect, after a foot pursuit when they mistook his cell phone for a gun.

April 24, 2019

CA Legislation to Change Lethal Force Justification Passes Committee Hearing

The bill’s main author, Assemblywoman Shirley Weber, D-San Diego, said AB 392 prevents “unnecessary deaths” by “clarifying law enforcement’s obligations.” Weber’s team said the legislation would push officers to rely on de-escalation techniques like verbal persuasion and crisis intervention methods instead of lethal force.

April 10, 2019

Retired Corrections Officers Can Now Patrol NJ Schools

A new state law in New Jersey will let almost all retired law enforcement under age 65 become armed school police officers, including former correctional officers who spent their careers guarding prisons.

March 22, 2019

Florida State Senator Files Bill to Triple Prison Time for Harming K-9s

Currently in Florida, killing a police dog is a third-degree felony -- which carries a sentence of up to five years in prison. If passed, the new legislation would make killing any public safety dog a second-degree felony, tripling the maximum prison sentence to up to 15 years.

November 29, 2018

Michigan Marijuana Legalization Proposal Passes

Michigan Marijuana Legalization Proposal Passes

The proposal to legalize marijuana for adult recreational use was on its way to victory early Wednesday morning, making Michigan the first state in the Midwest to approve legal weed.

November 7, 2018

Washington Police Oppose Proposed Legislation Restricting Gun Ownership
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