The Los Angeles Police Protective League (LAPPL) announced Sunday that rank-and-file officers have rejected the proposed contract offered by the City of Los Angeles.

A total of 5,823 LAPD officers voted in person July 8–11 against the tentative agreement.

"LAPD officers have spoken clearly. Their perspectives are consistent with those that we communicated at the bargaining table," said Tyler Izen, president of the LAPPL.

"There is a deep-seated frustration and anger among the officers caused by their low pay, working conditions, a disciplinary system that is viewed as biased and unfair, and their perception that management is unreceptive to their problems," Izen added. "It was aggravated by city hall's release of partial terms of the contract and violating confidentiality agreements with the League. Another factor was the Department’s complete lack of support to address the need for cash overtime which would prevent forced time off. Currently there are hundreds of fewer officers daily on the street which creates an officer and community safety issue. Adding to the frustration is the Department’s refusal to revamp a disciplinary system that has lost all credibility because it is viewed as arbitrary and inconsistent. The voting results illustrate the extent of the problems not being addressed by city hall and the Department.

"Overall crime is down in L.A., but so is the morale of LAPD officers. The membership believes that the contract offered by the City failed to recognize the outstanding work and dedication of LAPD officers who have driven crime down to record levels. Over the past five years, LAPD officers have done more than their fair share to help the City through tough economic times. Previous concessions by officers included cuts in pay and higher out-of-pocket payment for benefits, including pensions," said Izen.

Compared to other Southern California law enforcement agencies, salaries for LAPD officers are obviously lower and the fact that LAPD had to bargain for cash overtime is inconsistent with other police departments nationwide.

"Our members have rejected a contract without a cost of living adjustment. The chief often says, cops count, let's hope the City agrees," said Izen.

The LAPPL board of directors and its membership are dedicated to securing a contract reflective of the wages, benefits, and working conditions that they deserve.

"The LAPPL remains willing to work with the City to achieve a contract that will be fair to LAPD officers and ensure the needs of the public will continue to be served," said Izen.

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