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The Aryan Brotherhood is a prison gang consisting of primarily white members. "AB" members ordinarily wear numerous and varied body tattoos, but the true AB tattoo is a shamrock, the letters AB and three sixes. Tattoos of the swastika, a picture of a bluebird and of double lighting bolts are also used to identify Aryan Brotherhood members. In many ways AB is a white supremacist gang with Nazi leanings, however, it is not to be confused with groups like Aryan Nations or the Klan. For AB, money and power are more important than racist ideology. One of the leaders of the gang is Jewish; there are also Hispanic and biracial members.

White Gang Tattoos

The Aryan Brotherhood, which is also known as "AB" or "The Brand," is a primarily white prison gang with about 15,000 members in and out of prison. According to the FBI, the gang makes up only one percent of the prison population, but is responsible for 18 percent of all murders in the federal corrections system. Members use symbols in their tattoos such as swastikas, SS lightning bolts, the number 666, and Celtic imagery.

This tattoo of a prison tower, hour glass, and prisoner breaking out of the prison wall signifies this person has done prison time.

Prison and Gang Ink Symbols

In addition to advertising gang membership, tattoos provide other details about the bearer.  For the incarcerated, images of chains and locks represent the loss of freedom; an hourglass or clock face without hands indicate doing time; a string of numbers may be an inmate's prison ID; one laughing face, one crying face means play now, pay later or my happy life, my sad life; a tombstone with numbers may indicate years of incarceration; the face of a female crying usually means someone on the outside is waiting for them. Caption information provided by POLICE gang expert Richard Valdemar.

The 5.11 XPRT (Extreme Performance for Rapid Tactics) Black Boot comes with a Sympatex waterproof-breathable membrane and protects against bloodborne pathogens. The boots feature 5.11's trademark Shock Mitigation System for reduced impact, composite Kick-Toe technology, and Talon Stabilizer ankle support.

Duty Boots: 2009

You might not be Cinderella or even Prince Charming, but you deserve a pair of boots that meets your finicky standards. Good looks are only part of the criteria that need to be met. Your boots should provide proper fit, comfort, and durability, in addition to any other personal preferences. New footwear styles for patrol include such features as side zippers, new waterproofing technologies, and improved shock absorption, not to mention good-looking designs.

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Gang Graffiti

Graffiti continues to be used as a written form of communication between street gangs. An observant patrol officer can read graffiti and collect valuable information about past, current and future gang activities. Graffiti can be used to mark off turf boundaries, give insults to rival gangs, act as a warning of impending death, list fallen comrades, announce the presence of a gang in a certain area of the city or show gang alliances. Editor's Note: Images contain profanity.

The Mexican Mafia prison gang, also known as La Eme, was formed in the late 1950s by members of a Chicano street gang incarcerated at the Deuel Vocational Institution in Tracy, Calif. The initial founding member was Luis "Huero Buff" Flores, who was previously a member of the Hawaiian Gardens gang. Mexican Mafia symbols include a black hand, the letters "MM" or the term La Eme.

Latino Gang Tattoos

Tattoos are an excellent tool for law enforcement and corrections officers to use to identify known or suspected gang members. This gallery includes examples of tattoos worn by predominanly Latino gangs such as the Mexican Mafia, MS-13, and the Latin Kings. The number "13" is used because M (or La Eme) is the thirteenth letter of the alphabet and is used to signify the Mexican Mafia, which uses Sureños—gangs that swear allegiance to the Mexican Mafia—to carry out its orders from prison.

Cable network TLC debuted "Police Women of Broward County" on Aug. 6. The network returns to the Florida county that spawned police reality pioneer "Cops" for a show that follows female law enforcement deputies from the Broward Sheriff's Office, as they pursue suspects, make arrests and hone their skills at the firing range. The deputies are (left to right) Ana Murillo, Shelunda Johnson-Cooper, Julie Bower and Andrea Penoyer.

Broward Police Women

Cable network TLC has debuted "Police Women of Broward County." The network returns to the Florida county that spawned police reality pioneer "Cops" for a show that follows female law enforcement deputies from the Broward Sheriff's Office, as they pursue suspects, make arrests and hone their skills at the firing range. Photos courtesy of TLC.

When you bestow the trade name "Rocky" on a line of computers, they had better be tough. Amrel's Rocky line of rugged computers lives up to its name. The line, which includes tablets and notebooks, is ruggedized to MIL-STD 810F and IP54. They can sustain rain, shock, humidity, vibration, salt, fog, altitude, and extreme temperatures. Yet, they are also light and fast. The Rocky RT-M, features an Intel Core 2 Duo processor (with 4MB L2Cache), 1GB of memory, a 160GB hard drive, and a 13.3-inch anti-reflective TFT display.

Ruggedized Computers

Each year, at the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) Conference in the fall, computer manufacturers introduce their new ruggedized laptops designed for in-vehicle use by law enforcement officers and deputies. View a photo gallery of several of the models that arrived for 2009, such as the Amrel Rocky RT-M, Dell Latitude E6400 XFR, Getac V100, Itronix GD6000 and Panasonic Toughbook 30F.

Police women at the LAPD's pistol range in 1948. Photo courtesy of the Los Angeles Police Historical Society.

Pioneering Women of the LAPD

The first female police officer in the country with arrest powers, Alice Stebbins Wells, arrived in 1910 with the Los Angeles Police Department. By 1937, the department employed 39 policewomen. Women are serving in most areas of the department; they have yet to crack the elite SWAT unit, but a 2008 report led to 12 women being accepted into the training program that feeds the unit. These photos, which show several of the pioneering police women of the department, have been provided by the Los Angeles Police Historical Society.

Tactical Systems' HD can handl;e rough terrain, climb common household stairs and tow up to a 300-pound load. It also has a range of 1,200 feet and an on-board video system that can capture eight hours of footage using a pan/tilt infrared video camera that operates in low-light conditions. It can capture images up to one mile away (line of sight).

Tactical Robots

If you think robots are just for bomb disposal, think again. Police robots are often used to handle IEDs, but they can be used in other arenas that are inhospitable to humans. Robots can be used to reach a barricaded subject or hostages and carry information or evidence back out without sending an officer into the line of fire. They can also provide enhanced surveillance and deploy lethal or less-lethal weapons.

Lenco produces the B.E.A.R. (Ballistic Engineered Armored Response). The B.E.A.R. is built on a commercial truck chassis, using commercial parts, that makes it mechanic-friendly and brings warranty support from the manufacturer. The vehicle features certified hardened steel armor and ballistic glass that's capable of multiple hits, blast-resistant floors, specially designed gunports, roof hatches and multiple ingress/egress doors. The B.E.A.R.'s larger size allows up to 15 personnel to be transported and 25 to 30 persons to be evacuated. This is an ARV with multiple uses, including emergency/hostage rescue, TEMS, etc. The interior compartment is capable of housing the logistics needs of most SWAT teams.

Armored Rescue Vehicles

In the past decade, a new wave of commercial ARVs specifically built for law enforcement has hit the market. Few agencies could afford these big-ticket items prior to then, so initially the expense made it slow-going for the police armored vehicle industry. Then 9/11 changed law enforcement's attitude, and the formation of the Department of Homeland Security and its grant programs led to unprecedented funding for local law enforcement equipment, including ARVs. Responding to this increased demand, ARV manufacturers are developing the next generation of ARVs to meet the needs of contemporary tactical officer.

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