FREE e-Newsletter
Important News - Hot Topics
Get them Now!

William Bratton is taking over the helm of the NYPD, what should be his top priority?





Photo Galleries

Displaying 211  -  220  of  241
The newest player in the market is 5.11 Tactical with the Light for Life. This fl ashlight is a radical departure from your everyday light in that it has no batteries. Ivus Energy Innovations developed Flashpoint Power Technology, a way to allow a capacitor to "bleed" off its energy and run a light. It operates through the use of computerized digital circuitry and ultra capacitors, allowing the light to go from no charge to full charge in about 90 seconds. Because it can be recharged 500,000 cycles and has a bulb life of 50,000 hours, this could be the ideal light for your cruiser, station, or anywhere you want to ensure you have a light for daily or emergency use.

Duty Flashlights: 2009

A good duty light should be easily carried on a duty belt, provide adequate illumination up to 50 yards away, and be long enough that it protrudes from both sides of a fist so the light can act as a last-ditch impact weapon. The light should also be able to be used in conjunction with a sidearm in the Harries or Rogers technique. Xenon bulbs put out a tight beam and mega amounts of lumens; but they eat batteries and the lamp assemblies are expensive when you need a new bulb. LEDs, on the other hand, are rapidly approaching the light output of xenon at 50 yards or so. These models became available in 2009.

The trigger of the DDM4 is crisp and breaks cleanly at four pounds. This coupled with the tight fit of the receivers and quality barrel makes this M4 wicked accurate.
 

Daniel Defense M4 Carbine

Although the Daniel Defense M4, or DDM4, is a factory rifle, it looks like it was built by a custom shop. This carbine ships with quad fore rails, a removable backup sight, Magpul MOE adjustable stock, Daniel Defense vertical fore grip, a flared/beveled trigger guard, a flared mag well, and a Magpul 30-round PMAG.

This year, Glock unveiled the G22 RTF2. The "RTF2" in G22 RTF2 stands for rough textured frame version number 2. This pistol is designed to give the shooter a very secure grip. It has 4,000 raised pyramids on the front, rear, and sides of the polymer receiver. In addition, the slide has crescent-shaped serrations for easier manipulation with gloves or slippery hands.

Handguns: 2009

The gun manufacturers have been busy building some truly innovative firearms for law enforcement in 2009. The following is a quick look at some of the more interesting handgun models that have come to the attention of POLICE in recent months. Some of these weapons have been featured in our "Arsenal" firearms review features. Others are on our radar for future articles.

You'll need several pieces of gear to photographically document injuries. A digital SLR (single lens reflex) camera with a dedicated macro lens and ring flash system is preferrable. If a point-and-shoot is used, it needs an optical zoom lens, good built-in flash, a macro setting and flash control. Several scales can be effective, such as the ABFO (American Board of Forensic Odontology) bike mark scale for small injuries. Use a 90-degree scale for larger areas.

How To Photograph Injuries

Good photographs documenting physical injuries start even before the camera is out of the bag, because you need to have the proper mindset. These photos aren't just for police departments. They'll be viewed by the prosecutor, defense attorney, judge and, most importantly, the jury will scrutinize your work. Good composition, proper exposure and attention to detail speak volumes about your skill and dedication. Sloppy, out-of-focus images give the impression of incompetence.

Officers form a two-by-two line while preparing to run through the test patterns of cones. The event began shortly after 9 a.m., and officers tested their skills of maneuvering bikes that weighed between 700 and 900 pounds through tight spaces and around narrow turns.

Motorcycle Skills Competition

An annual California police motorcycle skills competition drew almost 500 officers to a sun-drenched parking lot along the Huntington Beach sand to compete for top-rider honors, train on patterns of neatly arranged orange cones and share a few moments of levity about their specialized patrol work. The Orange County Traffic Officer's Association hosted the annual police motorcycle skills competition, which nearly doubled in attendance from a year ago.

Here's a precursor to the 1959 Chevy Biscayne that set a new standard for law enforcement vehicles with the specially tuned, policy only version with a 348-cubic-inch V8 capable of propelling the car to a then-impressive 135 mph. This is the hard-top, two-door 1954 Bel Air Sports Coupe. The vehicles were relatively cheap to purchase and powerful. Photo via Zanthia/Flickr.

Classic Chevy Patrol Cars

This week's announcement that General Motors is bringing back the Chevy Caprice patrol car, an officer favorite it stopped producing in 1996, put the editors of POLICE Magazine in the mood to remember the Chevy patrol cars of years past. Chevy has a strong legacy in the patrol car market, and the reintroduction of the Caprice patrol car has excited officers who remember the hot pursuer of the 1990s. We'll start off with the 1954 Chevy Bel Air, a patrol car that was affordable and powerful.

The rear-wheel-drive Caprice returns in 2011 to join GM's police lineup that also includes the Impala patrol car and Tahoe SUV patrol vehicle. The company has a long history in law enforcement, with notable models including the 1959 Chevy Biscayne, the 1965 "big-block" Chevys, the 1976 Impala and the 1994 Caprice.

2011 Chevrolet Caprice

General Motors executives announced they plan to begin production of a new rear-wheel drive Chevrolet Caprice Police Patrol Vehicle today at the International Association of Chiefs of Police conference in Denver. The 2011 Caprice PPV will be available in two configurations: a 355-hp V8 that generates an estimated 384 lb-ft of torque and a tamer V6. An undercover version will also be available. Regardless of how it is configured, the sleek Caprice PPV is likely to make an impression on traffic scofflaws. Revealing the concept car, GM executive Jim Campbell touted the car's bold and commanding presence. He asked, "Can you imagine this baby in your rearview mirror?"

BMW offers two police motorcycles: the R1200 RT-P (pictured) and G650. The RT-P, which is favored by the CHP and Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, is the police version of a civilian model that offers an 1170 cc boxer twin motor rated at 110 hp. The bike uses two batteries: one to start and an auxiliary to run the lights, onboard computer and other gear. There are analog and digital speedometers; the later allows the officer to pace a vehicle, monitor its speed and store that information in the onboard computer. The bike arrives with mounts for a shotgun, baton, radio and laser gun. Photo via BMW Motor Co.

Police Motorcycles: 2009

Officers patrolling for agencies that purchased motorcycles from the 2009 model year will be riding one of six models. Harley-Davidson, which began producing police motorcycles in 1908, offers the Road King and Electra Glide (identical engine with sidecar mounting). BMW's R1200 RT-P is a favorite of the California Highway Patrol and Los Angles Sheriff's Department. The company also offers the G650. In 2007, Honda began producing its ST1300, a compact, performance bike. And H-D subsidiary Buell began producing a police version of its Ulysses sportbike in late 2008. Roads can't contain that bike, which has already been put to use by several rural departments.

The PRISim system is designed for both marksmanship and force option and force articulation training. A wide variety of lethal and less-lethal weapons are available for use with the simulator. For extra realism and for elevating the students’ stress level, instructors can use the integrated ShootBack system. The ShootBack cannon fires .68 caliber nylon balls at speeds up to 120-feet-per second. That’s enough velocity to sting a bit and remind a student to use cover in a gunfight.

Training Simulators

The first law enforcement simulators were 16 mm projectors that flickered their filmed images onto sheets strung across shooting ranges. When the bad guy went for his gun, the officer had to fire and then await the judgement of his trainer as to whether it was a good shoot. Today's simulators are high-tech computer systems with digital projectors that play complex interactive scenarios. They are designed not only to teach officers when and how to shoot guns and less-lethal weapons but also how to talk to suspects to avoid escalation and confrontation.

The Aryan Brotherhood is a prison gang consisting of primarily white members. "AB" members ordinarily wear numerous and varied body tattoos, but the true AB tattoo is a shamrock, the letters AB and three sixes. Tattoos of the swastika, a picture of a bluebird and of double lighting bolts are also used to identify Aryan Brotherhood members. In many ways AB is a white supremacist gang with Nazi leanings, however, it is not to be confused with groups like Aryan Nations or the Klan. For AB, money and power are more important than racist ideology. One of the leaders of the gang is Jewish; there are also Hispanic and biracial members.

White Gang Tattoos

The Aryan Brotherhood, which is also known as "AB" or "The Brand," is a primarily white prison gang with about 15,000 members in and out of prison. According to the FBI, the gang makes up only one percent of the prison population, but is responsible for 18 percent of all murders in the federal corrections system. Members use symbols in their tattoos such as swastikas, SS lightning bolts, the number 666, and Celtic imagery.

Get Your FREE Trial Issue and Win a Gift! Subscribe Today!
Yes! Please rush me my FREE TRIAL ISSUE of POLICE magazine and FREE Officer Survival Guide with tips and tactics to help me safely get out of 10 different situations.

Just fill in the form to the right and click the button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.

If POLICE does not satisfy you, just write "cancel" on the invoice and send it back. You'll pay nothing, and the FREE issue is yours to keep. If you enjoy POLICE, pay only $25 for a full one-year subscription (12 issues in all). Enjoy a savings of over 60% off the cover price!

Offer valid in US only. Outside U.S., click here.
It's easy! Just fill in the form below and click the red button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.
First Name:
Last Name:
Rank:
Agency:
Address:
City:
State:
  
Zip Code:
 
Country:
We respect your privacy. Please let us know if the address provided is your home, as your RANK / AGENCY will not be included on the mailing label.
E-mail Address:

Police Magazine