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Search Result: U.S. Supreme Court Cases

Displaying 81  -  100  of  146

'Don't Talk To My Client!'

February 7, 2011

The Constitution does not forbid you to talk to a person just because that person has an attorney, or just because the attorney tells you not to do it. Instead, the law focuses on whether the suspect is willing to talk without his or her attorney present.

SCOTUS Appears To Give Police More Leeway In Searches

January 13, 2011
In the past, the high court has said officers need a search warrant to enter a home, but during arguments in a drug case, the court's conservatives said they favored relaxing that rule when police say they have a need to act fast.

Vehicle Searches: Where and When?

December 1, 2010

It would be great if there were a single, simple rule to tell you where and when you may lawfully search a vehicle for contraband or evidence. Unfortunately, there are multiple rules, and sometimes more than one of them may apply.

SCOTUS To Decide If Fleeing From Officers Should Carry Violent Felony Sentencing

October 15, 2010
The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to render a decision on whether using a vehicle to flee from police after being ordered to stop should be considered a violent felony and justify a longer sentence.

Second Amendment v. Gun Control

October 1, 2010

As a result of these back-to-back rulings from the Supreme Court, neither the federal government nor any city, county, or state may enforce any law that creates a blanket prohibition against the possession of firearms by an individual in the home.

Electronic Privacy on the Job

September 3, 2010

Increasingly, law enforcement agencies issue electronic communication and information equipment to employees for their use in performing official duties. Access to and use and monitoring of the information stored or transmitted by means of such devices may be subject to a variety of employer policies, state and federal statutes, constitutional provisions, and case law.

Miranda Invocation and Waiver

August 10, 2010

If a suspect wants to assert either his right to counsel or his right to silence, it is up to him to do so, unequivocally and unambiguously.

The 'Independent Source' Doctrine

July 30, 2010

If you can identify two or more ways to justify a detention, arrest, search, or entry, you increase the odds that at least one of them will be upheld in court.

Chicago Mayor Says City Will Revise Gun Laws After High Court Ruling

June 28, 2010
"I'm disappointed by the decision, but it's not surprising," Mayor Daley said at a news conference. "We're still reviewing the entire decision, but it means that Chicago's current handgun ban is unenforceableā€¦"

Supreme Court Rules for Gun Owners in Chicago Handgun Case

June 28, 2010
The Supreme Court on Monday extended the Second Amendment's right to keep and bear arms to the states in the second major victory for gun rights supporters in as many years.

U.S. Supreme Court Allows PDs to Search Officer Pagers

June 17, 2010
The Ontario (Calif.) Police Department fired Sgt. Jeff Quon after an internal audit determined he had sent a flurry of personal text messages using his department-issued pager.

Exclusive: What the Supreme Court's New Miranda Decision Means to You

June 2, 2010
This significant new decision firmly establishes that once a suspect has received the Miranda warnings and indicates that he understands his rights, officers are not required to ask whether he wishes to waive or invoke but may simply start asking questions about the case.

Liability for Failure to Protect

June 1, 2010

A person can frame a federal lawsuit against an officer under either the "special relationship" doctrine or the "state-created danger" doctrine.

Understanding Probable Cause

May 18, 2010

Probable cause is much less than proof "beyond a reasonable doubt," which the prosecutor must meet in order to convict a defendant. But PC is something more than the "reasonable suspicion" required to justify a temporary investigative detention.

How It All Began: Miranda v. Arizona

May 11, 2010

The genesis of the Miranda warnings can be traced to March 13, 1963, when Ernesto Arturo Miranda was arrested by officers of the Phoenix Police Department for stealing $4 from a bank worker and for the kidnap and rape of another woman.

Miranda Warning Issues

May 11, 2010

Miranda warnings are triggered by a simple formula: Custody + Interrogation = The requirement for Miranda warnings. A motorist is not in "custody" for Miranda purposes when he or she is detained for an ordinary traffic stop.

Rules of Engagement

May 7, 2010

They wanted to know why Walters didn't shoot the knife out of Collins' hand? Shoot to maim? Why would Walters be in fear for his life since he was wearing body armor? And they wanted to know, could an X-acto knife really kill you?

Rewriting the Edwards Rule

May 7, 2010

The Edwards rule applies to all officers and all cases - not just to the case on which the suspect invoked the right to counsel.

U.S. Supreme Court Hears SWAT Texting Case

April 20, 2010
U.S. Supreme Court justices began discussing the merits of the firing of a California SWAT sergeant for receiving sexually explicit text messages on his department-issued pager.

Justifying Temporary Detentions

March 2, 2010

When a marked police car pulls into a high-crime area and people start running away for no apparent reason, this is reasonable suspicion to stop them.

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