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Search Result: U.S. Supreme Court Cases

Displaying 61  -  80  of  140

SCOTUS: Officers Justified In Entering Teen's Home

January 24, 2012
Burbank (Calif.) Police officers investigating a rumor that a truant teenager was planning to "shoot up" Bellarmine-Jefferson High School five years ago were justified in invading the student's home without a warrant because of concerns that violence was imminent, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday.

SCOTUS: Police GPS Trackers Require Warrant

January 23, 2012
Federal agents violated a suspect's privacy rights, when they used a Global Positioning System device to track his movements for 28 days without a warrant, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled.

The Independent Source Doctrine

January 12, 2012

Although some searches and seizures may only be justifiable under a single approach, many can be justified several different ways. The U.S. Supreme Court has long held that when this is the case, any independent source of contested evidence will suffice, even when another does not.

Supreme Court to Review Ariz. Immigration Law

December 13, 2011
The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments in the lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of Arizona's immigration law, Senate Bill 1070. Its ruling could impact immigration laws nationwide and push the immigration debate into the spotlight during the final months of the 2012 presidential race.

Four Famous Cases

December 2, 2011

The decade of the 1960s gave us four of the most significant cases that apply to our daily work: Mapp, Brady, Miranda, and Terry. These four are among the most prominent criminal law cases you should know more about to understand how we got to where we are.

SCOTUS Considers GPS Tracking by LE

November 2, 2011
This week, the U.S. Supreme Court is considering whether attaching a high-tech tracking device to suspect's vehicle without a warrant is constitutional.

The Big Payout

August 12, 2011

Our legal system is terribly stacked against law enforcement officers and for plaintiff's attorneys. The U.S. code itself specifies how attorney fees will be set in civil rights cases against cops. That's why so many cases are filed against you and the agencies and government entities that employ you. Lawmakers—mostly lawyers themselves—set up paydays for their colleagues.

SCOTUS Sides with LE on Illegal Searches

June 16, 2011
The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled in favor of law enforcement officers who perform an illegal search in good faith, which wouldn't trigger the exclusionary rule for evidence that incriminated the subject.

SCOTUS Expands Miranda Rights for Juveniles

June 16, 2011
The U.S. Supreme Court has expanded Miranda rights for juveniles, issuing a 5-4 decision stemming from a case involving North Carolina officers who had questioned a 13-year-old.

Probable Cause and Reasonable Suspicion

June 7, 2011

Some actions you take have been classified by Supreme Court decisions as requiring that you articulate a "reasonable suspicion" in order to make them constitutionally reasonable, while others can be undertaken only if there is "probable cause" ("PC"). But what do these terms mean? And how do you match the right level of justification with the kind of conduct you're seeking to justify?

Smartphones: How Defense Attorneys Can Use Discovery Rules To Ensnare You

June 1, 2011
Because smartphone technology is relatively new, the Supreme Court has not decided a case that specifically addresses the question of what types of law enforcement smartphone records are discovery material.

SCOTUS Overturns Cop Killer's Conviction

May 26, 2011
The court overturned the conviction of Charles Fowler for the 1998 shooting of a Florida officer. Fowler was convicted for violating a federal communications statute and given life in prison.

SCOTUS Decision Could Lead to Release of 46,000 Calif. Inmates

May 23, 2011
The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld a three-judge panel's order to release more than one-fourth of California's prison population to relieve overcrowding. In a 5-4 decision, the court sided with the panel that had ruled inmates didn't have adequate access to medical care.

Supreme Court Sides With Police on Evidence-Destruction Case

May 16, 2011
A U.S. Supreme Court decision handed down Monday gives law enforcement officers the right to forcibly enter a residence if they suspect evidence is being destroyed after they have announced their presence.

'Don't Talk To My Client!'

February 7, 2011

The Constitution does not forbid you to talk to a person just because that person has an attorney, or just because the attorney tells you not to do it. Instead, the law focuses on whether the suspect is willing to talk without his or her attorney present.

SCOTUS Appears To Give Police More Leeway In Searches

January 13, 2011
In the past, the high court has said officers need a search warrant to enter a home, but during arguments in a drug case, the court's conservatives said they favored relaxing that rule when police say they have a need to act fast.

Vehicle Searches: Where and When?

December 1, 2010

It would be great if there were a single, simple rule to tell you where and when you may lawfully search a vehicle for contraband or evidence. Unfortunately, there are multiple rules, and sometimes more than one of them may apply.

SCOTUS To Decide If Fleeing From Officers Should Carry Violent Felony Sentencing

October 15, 2010
The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to render a decision on whether using a vehicle to flee from police after being ordered to stop should be considered a violent felony and justify a longer sentence.

Second Amendment v. Gun Control

October 1, 2010

As a result of these back-to-back rulings from the Supreme Court, neither the federal government nor any city, county, or state may enforce any law that creates a blanket prohibition against the possession of firearms by an individual in the home.

Electronic Privacy on the Job

September 3, 2010

Increasingly, law enforcement agencies issue electronic communication and information equipment to employees for their use in performing official duties. Access to and use and monitoring of the information stored or transmitted by means of such devices may be subject to a variety of employer policies, state and federal statutes, constitutional provisions, and case law.

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