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Mark Rivera

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Mark Rivera, Customer Retention Manager and CJIS Security Compliance Officer with Vigilant Solutions, served for sixteen years with the Maryland State Police, retiring at the rank of First Sergeant with thirteen of those years at the supervisory and command level. He holds a Master of Science Degree in Management from The Johns Hopkins University and Secret clearance through the FBI, Baltimore.

Search Result: U.S. Supreme Court Cases

Displaying 1  -  20  of  154

Police May Use Evidence Found After Illegal Stops, Supreme Court Says

June 21, 2016
The Supreme Court ruled on Monday that evidence found by police officers after illegal stops may be used in court if the officers conducted their searches after learning that the defendants had outstanding arrest warrants.

Overlooked Legal Nuggets

May 4, 2016

From time to time, we get a really helpful decision that can make our jobs easier, and yet few people seem to learn about it or realize its significance. Here are 10 such decisions from the U.S. Supreme Court.

Justices Divided Over N.J. Police Officer's First Amendment Case

January 21, 2016
Heffernan was demoted to patrol officer the next day and told it was because of his "overt" involvement in a political campaign. But was it a First Amendment issue?

Supreme Court Strikes Down Florida Death Sentence Process

January 12, 2016
Florida's death penalty sentencing process violates the constitutional rights of criminal defendants by granting judges powers that juries should wield, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday.

Trooper Who Shot at Fleeing Driver Cannot Be Sued, Says Supreme Court

November 10, 2015
The Supreme Court decided Monday that a Texas state trooper who shot and killed a fleeing suspect in a high-speed chase cannot be held civilly liable for the man's death, even though the officer's superior had told him not to shoot.

Supreme Court Rules Police Must Obtain Warrant to Search Hotel or Motel Registries

June 23, 2015
The case concerning hotel registries is likely to have a broad impact, as dozens of cities allow warrantless searches, which law enforcement officials say help them catch fugitives and fight prostitution and drug dealing.

Unlawfully Prolonged Traffic Stop

June 18, 2015

Is it OK under the Fourth Amendment to turn a traffic stop into a criminal investigation? Of course it is, provided the justification for the additional investigation is developed during the reasonable duration of the traffic stop—not after.

Supreme Court Sides With Police in Confrontations With Mentally Disabled

May 19, 2015
The Supreme Court ruled Monday that police cannot be sued for using force against people with mental disabilities when their constitutional right to privacy is not clear.

Supreme Court Questions North Carolina Sex Offender Law

March 31, 2015
A North Carolina program of monitoring sex offenders by GPS needs closer judicial scrutiny, the Supreme Court ruled Monday.

Mistake of Law: To Err Is Human

February 27, 2015

In a series of cases, the court has upheld searches and seizures made by officers who were mistaken in their understanding of the facts they confronted, or as to the law to be applied.

SCOTUS Rules Evidence Cannot Be Suppressed Just Because an Officer Made a "Reasonable" Traffic Stop Mistake

December 16, 2014
Writing for the court, Chief Justice John Roberts noted that the keystone of the Fourth Amendment ban on unreasonable search and seizure is the word "unreasonable." And in this case, the officer's belief that having a broken tail light was illegal counted as a reasonable mistake. The traffic stop and the subsequent consensual search of the car were therefore also reasonable.

The 5 Biggest Search-and-Seizure Myths

November 11, 2014

Ever since the U.S. Supreme Court made the Fourth Amendment exclusionary rule binding on the states in the 1961 decision in Mapp v. Ohio, thousands of published decisions from state and federal courts have applied the exclusionary rule to thousands of searches and seizures. It's no wonder the 50-year tidal wave of exclusionary decisions has left confusion and misunderstanding in its wake. Here are five areas of the law that seem to suffer the most in translation.

The 5 Biggest Miranda Myths

October 28, 2014

Some myths that have sprouted from Miranda have shown so much inertia that the Supreme Court has had to keep coming back to try to knock them down. Here are five of the most persistent.

SCOTUS Hears Case on Officer's Mistaken Traffic Stop That Led to Cocaine Bust

October 7, 2014
The Supreme Court opened its new term Monday pondering whether a police officer's misunderstanding of the law can justify a traffic stop that led to the seizure of illegal drugs.

Why You Should Double Check for Accuracy

August 8, 2014

Although law enforcement officers are given considerable leeway for reasonable mistakes, you don't get much slack for unreasonable mistakes that result from hasty reactions to bad information that comes from your own official sources.

Cell Phone Search Incident to Arrest

July 11, 2014

Just when it looks like a rule is finally refined to the point of general understanding, the Supreme Court takes an unexpected turn, as it recently did on the subject of searching an arrestee's cell phone incident to his arrest.

How SCOTUS Cell Phone Search Warrant Ruling Affects You

June 26, 2014
On June 25, the Supreme Court ruled that the well-established exception permitting some searches incident to arrest does not apply to data searches of the arrestee's cell phone. But there are some details that you should know.

Court Rules Officers Need Warrants to Search Arrestees' Phones

June 25, 2014
The old rules, Chief Justice Roberts said, cannot be applied to “modern cellphones, which are now such a pervasive and insistent part of daily life that the proverbial visitor from Mars might conclude they were an important feature of human anatomy.”

High Court: 'Straw' Gun Purchases Illegal

June 17, 2014
The Supreme Court on Monday deemed "straw" purchases of firearms illegal, delivering a huge win to advocates of stricter gun controls. The case, Abramski v. United States, centered on a former police officer who bought a Glock 19 handgun for his uncle.

TASER Case Could Get SCOTUS Review

May 19, 2014
A January 2008 in-custody death could get a SCOTUS review. This would be the court’s first look at police use of stun guns after turning away appeals from both recipients of the high-voltage shocks and from police officers.
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