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Security Policy and the Cloud

Ask The Expert

Mark Rivera

FBI-CJIS Security Policy Compliance Officer

Mark Rivera, Customer Retention Manager and CJIS Security Compliance Officer with Vigilant Solutions, served for sixteen years with the Maryland State Police, retiring at the rank of First Sergeant with thirteen of those years at the supervisory and command level. He holds a Master of Science Degree in Management from The Johns Hopkins University and Secret clearance through the FBI, Baltimore.

Search Result: Search and Seizure

Displaying 101  -  120  of  159

Confined Spaces and Tunnel Rats

December 22, 2010
It takes a special officer to willingly, capably, and effectively search confined spaces for suspects. During the Vietnam War, "tunnel rats" were employed to search the often elaborate, always extremely hazardous NVA/VC tunnel systems.

Searching for Hidden Suspects

December 13, 2010
I'd say every SWAT team trains extensively on suspect searches with special emphasis on the terrain they're dealing with. Regardless of terrain type, every SWAT team must be adept at searching buildings and outdoor terrain.

Vehicle Searches: Where and When?

December 1, 2010

It would be great if there were a single, simple rule to tell you where and when you may lawfully search a vehicle for contraband or evidence. Unfortunately, there are multiple rules, and sometimes more than one of them may apply.

Concealed Suspects: Into the Hearts of Darkness

November 18, 2010

Attics, basements, closets, and crawlspaces all present great hazards to officers searching for concealed suspects.

Avoid Defective Search Warrants

November 11, 2010

Flaws in a warrant that are so obvious you should have recognized them can doom your search and seizure and eliminate the usual "good faith" protection.

SCOTUS To Decide Whether Officers Need Warrant To Conduct Sex Abuse Interviews at School

October 21, 2010
The Supreme Court has agreed to hear Camreta v. Greene, an Oregon case centering on a whether a child protective services caseworker and deputy sheriff violated the Fourth Amendment when they interrogated a child who alleged sexual abuse in a private office at the child's school for two hours without a warrant, exigent circumstances or parental consent.

Florida Man Denies Cocaine Recovered From Buttocks Is His

October 5, 2010
Deputies had searched the 25-year-old Roberts after smelling marijuana during a vehicle stop. He had been pulled over for speeding. Roberts possessed 4.5 grams of marijuana and 27 pieces of rock cocaine weighing 3.5 grams.

Paris Hilton May Challenge LV Metro's Search In Cocaine Bust

August 30, 2010
Hilton's attorneys may argue officers didn't follow proper procedure by taking her from the scene. She is also claiming the purse didn't belong to her, according to the report.

The 'Independent Source' Doctrine

July 30, 2010

If you can identify two or more ways to justify a detention, arrest, search, or entry, you increase the odds that at least one of them will be upheld in court.

U.S. Supreme Court Allows PDs to Search Officer Pagers

June 17, 2010
The Ontario (Calif.) Police Department fired Sgt. Jeff Quon after an internal audit determined he had sent a flurry of personal text messages using his department-issued pager.

A Short Cut to Termination?

June 3, 2010
Maybe one day the tide will change. Just this week, the Supreme Court made a long overdue clarification on the Miranda matter that is favorable to cops. And who knows? Perhaps one day they'll clean up the exclusionary rule, too.

Acing the Tests

May 28, 2010

Experience is the best teacher for learning to spot contraband drugs and alcohol and drug intoxication in the field. But the cop needs a demonstrable standard for evidence. It's here that presumptive field testing for alcohol and drugs is most useful.

Understanding Probable Cause

May 18, 2010

Probable cause is much less than proof "beyond a reasonable doubt," which the prosecutor must meet in order to convict a defendant. But PC is something more than the "reasonable suspicion" required to justify a temporary investigative detention.

Searching Rides: Dirty and Dangerous

April 29, 2010
The less inclined you are to search something in a vehicle you've stopped, the better the odds that you should. Diapers and sanitary napkins have been used to store narcotics.

U.S. Supreme Court Hears SWAT Texting Case

April 20, 2010
U.S. Supreme Court justices began discussing the merits of the firing of a California SWAT sergeant for receiving sexually explicit text messages on his department-issued pager.

Cognitive Dissonance

March 11, 2010

I focused on several likely hiding places: a container of Comet cleanser, filled with just cleanser; a PVC piece of pipe—only a bomb; a box of "SOS" pads....wait a minute!

Ohio Supreme Court Rules Warrant Needed To Search Cell Phones

December 17, 2009
Ohio patrol officers looking to gather evidence from the cell phones of people they question will now need a search warrant, following a ruling by that state's high court.

U.S. Supreme Court Will Hear LE Texting Case

December 14, 2009
The nation's high court will hear a case involving a California SWAT sergeant who was fired for using his departmental pager to transmit sexually explicit messages to his wife.

In-Home Arrest Searches

November 19, 2009

With reasonable suspicion that someone on the premises might endanger officers during the arrest or as they departed, officers could conduct a "protective sweep" of the entire premises, looking only into areas where a person could be concealed.

School Searches

October 30, 2009

Devallis Rutledge discusses why law enforcement officers should be aware of what public school officials can and can't do when conducting searches on campus. You can also read the original article "Public School Searches" from the October 2009 issue.

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