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Search Result: Retired Officers

Displaying 41  -  47  of  47

Cleaning Up the LEOSA Mess

October 22, 2009
If the LEOSA improvements bills become law, retired officers will need to have an official ID from their agency and qualify with a state-certified firearms instructor who qualifies police in their states of residence. This could make it much easier for retired officers from say Illinois agencies to exercise LEOSA carry rights.

Retired California Deputy Kills Purse Snatching Suspect

October 13, 2009
La Habra police received a call about 5 p.m. from a woman who said her purse had been snatched in the 1300 block of Beach Boulevard. Police then received a second call from the retired deputy, who said he was in his car chasing the suspects, who were fleeing in their vehicle, said Cindy Knapp, a spokeswoman for the La Habra Police Department.

NYPD Cracks Down on Ex-Cops for Using Trademarked Department Shield

July 10, 2009
The NYPD is warning retired cops they can't display the department shield on T-shirts or Web sites - drawing howls of outrage.

Virginia Security Company Offers Executive Protection Training for Cops

May 9, 2008
Cops are drawn to personal security work as a part-time job or employment after retirement. They need special training so they can learn the differences between being a cop and being a personal security professional, he explains.

30th Anniversary: Voices of Experience

October 1, 2006

On the occasion of our thirtieth anniversary, Police Magazine decided to contact veteran officers and ask them how law enforcement has changed in the past three decades.

The Afterlife

July 1, 2003

There are many benefits to pursuing a career in law enforcement, one of them being you can retire at a relatively young age with a pension. But to continue paying the bills, there are retired law enforcement officers working in just about every field of human enterprise.

Freelancing for Fugitives

March 1, 1996

If you think bounty hunters are mythical characters of the Wild West or figments of the imaginations of Hollywood scriptwriters, you'd better think again. The bounty hunter is alive and well in contemporary America.  The average fee for bringing in a bad guy runs between $400 and $600. Some par­ticularly high-profile cases can net $10,000 to $87,000 for an arrest.

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