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Search Result: Miranda Law

Displaying 1  -  20  of  53

Reduce Negative Impact of Miranda

March 11, 2014

Has Miranda v. Arizona adversely affected criminal justice and public safety? Miranda has resulted in the inability to clear a quarter-million homicides, 1 million rapes, 5 million robberies, and 9 million aggravated assaults.

When Silence is Golden

September 2, 2013

Whenever you see or hear a suspect doing or saying something an innocent person would not, your observations should go into your reports. The suspect's selective silence can sometimes indicate a consciousness of guilt.

Ninth Circuit: Miranda Warning Must Be In Perfect Spanish

July 16, 2013
A Miranda warning given in both English and Spanish to a Spanish-speaking suspect is insufficient if a police officer’s translation fails to convey the true meaning of the arrested person's rights, a federal appeals court decided Monday.

When Miranda Doesn't Matter

July 2, 2013

Miranda warnings should not be given when they aren't legally necessary such as when information is urgently needed to protect the safety of officers or the public, or to rescue a victim.

SCOTUS: Silence Can Be Evidence of Guilt

June 20, 2013
Crime suspects need to speak up if they want to invoke their legal right to remain silent, the Supreme Court said Monday in a ruling that highlights the limited reach of the famous Miranda decision.

4 Useful Law Enforcement Apps

June 10, 2013
As smartphones and other mobile devices become more prevalent in law enforcement, officers search for reference apps that quickly bring actionable information to the field.

50 Years After Miranda

May 21, 2013

Officers on the job before 1966 knew that the right to remain silent was guaranteed by the Constitution, but no officer from that era ever thought it was his job to remind offenders of their rights. That changed with the arrest of Ernesto Miranda in March 1963 and the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision that followed.

Boston Bombing Suspect Silent After Miranda

April 25, 2013
The surviving Boston Marathon bombing suspect has stopped talking to authorities, after a representative of the U.S. Attorney's Office entered his hospital room and advised him of his Miranda rights.

Boston Bombing Suspect: No Terror Group Help

April 23, 2013
Accused Boston bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has told FBI investigators that he and his brother were operating alone and did not receive assistance from outside terrorist groups, officials said Tuesday.

No Miranda Invocation for Boston Bombing Suspect

April 22, 2013
A special interrogation team for high-value suspects will question the surviving Boston Marathon bombing suspect without reading him his Miranda rights, U.S. Attorney Carmen Ortiz announced Friday.

Mistrial Declared In Miami Cop's Killing

March 20, 2013
Eight jurors wanted to acquit Dennis Escobar of the 1988 killing of a popular Miami patrolman. But four, bothered by key facts of Escobar's role in the slaying—some detailed in testimony from his own wife—couldn't agree to a not-guilty verdict

The Miranda Arrest

March 20, 2013

In March of 1963, Phoenix Police Officer Carroll Cooley arrested Ernesto Miranda. Fifty years later, Miranda warnings are as much a part of policing today as a set of handcuffs. Cooley, a retired captain, talked with POLICE Magazine about the historic arrest. Read the full story here.

Court: Barricaded Suspects Not Entitled To Miranda Warning

March 15, 2013
Even a barricaded suspect has the right to remain silent during a standoff, but police have no obligation to tell him that while trying to coax him out, an appeals court ruled this week.

Ariz. Death Row Inmate's Conviction Overturned

March 15, 2013
A federal appeals court has overturned a death sentence for an Arizona woman who arranged to have her 4-year-old son murdered, because a Phoenix Police detective failed to honor her Miranda rights.

The Miranda Arrest: 50 Years Later

March 13, 2013
In March of 1963, Phoenix Police Officer Carroll Cooley arrested Ernesto Miranda. Fifty years later, Miranda warnings are as much a part of policing today as a set of handcuffs.

Suspect-Initiated Interrogation

January 9, 2013

Once a custodial suspect has been given Miranda warnings and has acknowledged his understanding, he might waive his rights and submit to questioning, or he might invoke—either by indicating that he doesn't want to talk, or by requesting counsel.

Obama's Election Victory and the Supreme Court

December 27, 2012
What is the likely consequence of the re-election of Barack Obama with respect to judicial appointments, as they bear on law enforcement and public safety issues? In our business, we're trained to look for the clues. There are plenty of those to examine.

Lawyers and Miranda Warnings: Either/Or?

September 7, 2012

It sometimes happens that a suspect's lawyer offers to surrender him for arrest and agrees to let his or her client be questioned, provided the lawyer is present during the interrogation.

Miranda: When Custody Isn't "Custody"

April 4, 2012

Of the 55 subsequent Supreme Court opinions on Miranda issues, 14 have involved attempts to clarify the meaning of "custody," and in 12 of those 14, the Supreme Court reversed the decisions of state and federal appellate courts, which got it wrong.

SCOTUS: Miranda Warning Not Required for Inmate Questioned About Other Crime

February 21, 2012
The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled against a Michigan inmate who contended he should have received a Miranda warning before being interrogated in a prison conference room about sexual conduct with a 12-year-old boy.
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