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Search Result: How-To Guides

Displaying 81  -  100  of  171

How to Quickly Reload Your Revolver

December 14, 2009
Mike Larney of the ProArms podcast demonstrates the FLETC reload for the revolver as he was taught when he was an officer with the NYPD. You'll need a speed-loader for this one.

Interfacing With the Mentally Ill

December 4, 2009
This 1960 documentary, "Booked for Safekeeping (Part I)" was made to train officers to help mentally ill and confused people. The film advocates that mentaly ill people be held in the least restrictive environment possible, particularly not in a jail cell unless absolutely essential. The film points out that there are often inadequate facilities and services to deal with such people, and that is why the job falls to the police.

How You Can Become a Better Cop Right Now

November 12, 2009

Becoming a better cop may not ensure formal recognition such as a promotion, but it'll virtually guarantee it informally. It'll simultaneously help you to do your job faster and increase your prospects to work elsewhere.

How To Photograph Injuries

October 29, 2009

Good photographs documenting physical injuries start even before the camera is out of the bag, because you need to have the proper mindset. These photos aren't just for police departments. They'll be viewed by the prosecutor, defense attorney, judge and, most importantly, the jury will scrutinize your work. Good composition, proper exposure and attention to detail speak volumes about your skill and dedication. Sloppy, out-of-focus images give the impression of incompetence.

How Not to Rate a Storm

October 1, 2008

Hurricane country cops need a scale that screams the following message to the public: Get out! Get out, now!

How to Stretch Your Fleet Dollar

April 1, 2008

Managing the rising costs of police fleets is a challenge that all law enforcement agencies are facing. Fortunately, there are technologies available to help fleet managers better manage these costs and save their departments thousands of dollars annually.

How to Tell When You Need a Search Warrant

March 1, 2008

The general rule-of-thumb is to try to get a warrant whenever possible. On the other hand, if you can seize evidence without engaging in a search, you don't need either a warrant or any exception.

Solving Problems with PowerPoint and Video

February 26, 2008
Many trainers struggle with the use of video in training presentations. There are several problems that crop up frequently, and there are things that you can do to reduce the likelihood that you'll suffer from them.

Projector Blues

February 8, 2008
OK, you've got your laptop and cable, and you're at the training room, where you find the projector. How do you go about connecting them?

How to Buy a Used Handgun

January 1, 2008

One of the best ways to buy a firearm for personal use is to buy one that was previously owned. Don't laugh. Most of the handguns I purchased when I was in my twenties and thirties were pre-owned, and they are still putting rounds down range.

How to Deploy Impact Munitions

December 1, 2007

Today, law enforcement has access to a wide range of impact munitions that can be used for numerous applications. Yes, rubber and wooden baton rounds are still used in riot control, but more sophisticated impact rounds can be used to prevent suicides, to stop dog attacks, and in other uses that might have once required lethal force.

How to Spot a Concealed Firearm

November 1, 2007

Unfortunately, Officer Erfle will not be the last law enforcement officer who will fall victim to a bad guy carrying a concealed firearm. The reason is simple; unless you have cause to search, you really can't tell who is packing and who isn't.

How to Justify Officer Safety Searches

October 1, 2007

On average, 60,000 officers are assaulted on the job every year. That's an average of 164 per day. The risk level you face on the job makes it important not only to resist complacency and to follow prudent tactics, but also to understand how to ensure that your interactions with suspects are constitutionally justifiable, so that you are never forced to choose between being safe and being sued.

Put it in Writing

September 4, 2007
There is one simple reason that you should have a written training plan: limited resources. You have to plan how you will allocate your limited resources of time and money, so that your department gets the most bang for its buck.

How to Photograph Injuries

September 1, 2007

I've taught forensic photography to police officers for more than 10 years, and I always start my presentations with the notion that good photographs start even before the camera is out of the bag. You have to have the proper mindset because images documenting injuries are some of the most important photos we take.

How to Develop Informants

August 1, 2007

Some cops could use a hug. Others could use a Huggy Bear. Like Starsky and Hutch's trusty tattletale, reliable informants provide us with a worm's eye view of their sordid social circles, a heads up on threats to officer safety, and the groundwork for search warrants. They hang in circles we wouldn't want to enter. There is no question that the access they have and the intelligence they acquire is often invaluable to law enforcement.

How to Respond to Excited Delirium

July 1, 2007

Because you, as law enforcement officers, are often required to control subjects in various stages of agitation, it is important for you to understand that some of these subjects will be in a state of extreme physiologic stress. This state is often called "excited or agitated delirium."

How to Interview a Child

June 1, 2007

Interviewing a child is in some ways very similar to interviewing any crime victim but, in some ways, it's very different. The first hurdle is to get the child to open up.

How to Spot a Stolen Car

May 1, 2007

There are many motivations for stealing cars. Some are taken by kids for so-called “joyrides.” Others are shipped to foreign countries and resold or chopped into parts. And more and more often, stolen cars are used to facilitate other crimes, including burglaries, robberies, assaults, and the transportation of narcotics and smuggled immigrants.

How to Get the Most Out of Online Education

April 1, 2007

There’s one question that all prospective students ask before they sign up for a program that will allow them to complete their college degree online: Is this really any good? Scott Harr has a clear answer: “For some students, it’s better.”

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