FREE e-Newsletter
Important News - Hot Topics
Get them Now!

William Bratton is taking over the helm of the NYPD, what should be his top priority?





Also by Devallis Rutledge

Displaying 121  -  137  of  137

Borderless Concealed Carry

November 1, 2004

What if local laws forbid you to carry a concealed weapon?

Stop and Identify

October 1, 2004

During a temporary detention, does a person have a duty to identify himself or herself to the detaining officer? Can a person be arrested for refusing to do so? The answer to both questions is, "Sometimes."

Undercover Interrogation

August 1, 2004

The admissibility rule of Miranda v. Arizona generally dictates that you give the standard warning and get a voluntary waiver before interrogating a suspect in custody. But not always.

Incident to Arrest

July 1, 2004

A new Supreme Court ruling expands officers’ vehicle search capabilities.

Courtroom Conduct

June 1, 2004

After all you've gone through to make the collar and get the case prosecuted, the last thing you need is to cause a mistrial because of some miscue around the courthouse when your arrestee is on trial.

Hearsay and Confrontation

May 1, 2004

Hearsay rules confound police, lawyers, and judges alike. "Hearsay" is a statement made outside the courtroom that might be true or false, repeated in court to prove that it was true.

Massiah Vs. Miranda

April 1, 2004

Miranda, Miranda, Miranda. Sometimes, we spend so much time on this one aspect of interrogation law that we tend to forget there are three other constitutional tests of admissibility of a suspect's statement.

Vehicle Checkpoints

March 1, 2004

The U.S. Supreme Court recently considered whether it was permissible under the Fourth Amendment for law enforcement officers to locate witnesses to a fatal hit-and-run accident by setting up a checkpoint to stop vehicles.

Knock Before Entry

February 1, 2004

Is it always necessary to comply with knock notice before forcing entry to serve a search warrant?

Use of Force on Prisoners

January 3, 2004

Documentation and self-control are the keys to protecting yourself against charges of unreasonable force on persons in custody.

Eyewitness Identification

December 1, 2003

A pretrial identification procedure is considered too unreliable if it is "so impermissibly suggestive as to give rise to a very substantial likelihood of misidentification."

Officer Safety Searches

November 1, 2003

Obviously, no reasonable officer is going to risk his or her personal safety or the public safety in order to satisfy rules regulating the admissibility of evidence in a criminal trial, or even to avoid personal civil liability.

Chief Accountability

October 1, 2003

Sometimes the man or woman in charge shoulders the blame, even when not personally involved in an incident.

Cops and Civil Liability

September 1, 2003

Not everything that causes evidence to be excluded will expose you to civil liability, and not everything that can get you sued will result in suppression of evidence.

Avoiding De Facto Arrests

August 1, 2003

If police take someone from one location and transport him or her involuntarily to a police facility for investigation, this will be considered a de facto arrest. Without probable cause, that arrest will be unlawful, with predictable consequences for both evidence suppression and civil liability.

Demystifying Miranda

July 1, 2003

One of the most blatant mistakes entertainers insist on perpetuating is the notion that Miranda warnings have to be given immediately upon the suspect being hooked up.

Picture Perfect in the Eyes of the Court

February 1, 1996

If you're lucky enough to have an eye­witness to a crime, and your investigation leads to a possible perpetrator, getting a photo ID is often the next logical step. As with everything else you do, there's the wrong way and the court's way.

Get Your FREE Trial Issue and Win a Gift! Subscribe Today!
Yes! Please rush me my FREE TRIAL ISSUE of POLICE magazine and FREE Officer Survival Guide with tips and tactics to help me safely get out of 10 different situations.

Just fill in the form to the right and click the button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.

If POLICE does not satisfy you, just write "cancel" on the invoice and send it back. You'll pay nothing, and the FREE issue is yours to keep. If you enjoy POLICE, pay only $25 for a full one-year subscription (12 issues in all). Enjoy a savings of over 60% off the cover price!

Offer valid in US only. Outside U.S., click here.
It's easy! Just fill in the form below and click the red button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.
First Name:
Last Name:
Rank:
Agency:
Address:
City:
State:
  
Zip Code:
 
Country:
We respect your privacy. Please let us know if the address provided is your home, as your RANK / AGENCY will not be included on the mailing label.
E-mail Address:

Police Magazine