FREE e-Newsletter
Important News - Hot Topics
Get them Now!

Top News

Take-Home Cars Help With Wash. City Crime, Budget

February 25, 2014  | 

Yakima, Wash., city and police officials say giving each patrol officer a personal police vehicle to take home is paying off, and not just financially, reports the Yakima Herald-Republic.

In addition to boosting a police presence, officials say off-duty officers responding in the vehicles have assisted on several high-profile cases in the past month. Among the cases officials pointed to were the robbery at the Grizzly Espresso stand Feb. 10 and the Jan. 27 abduction of a teenage girl.

Capt. Jeff Schneider, who heads the patrol division, said when police learned the teen was being taken toward Cowiche, they were able to notify two off-duty officers who were able to catch up to the car. He said those officers were 10 miles closer to the car the teen was in than other units in the city.

The car was eventually stopped and the girl was rescued by police, who also apprehended one of the teens accused of abducting her.

Tags: Take-Home Vehicles, Patrol Cars, Yakima (Wash.) Police Department


Comments (10)

Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Ima Leprechaun @ 2/25/2014 10:33 AM

In the south take home cruisers are done a lot. They are allowed to use the car for private use but they are expected to help out if they are needed in an emergency. In my country to makes it appear to the public as though there are Deputies everywhere and it has a big impact on crime. Take home cruises is a great idea and it also makes responsibility for the equipment easier to maintain since only one person will have that vehicle and will be responsible for that equipment. Off the subject since there is nowhere here to blog on this: The Chief of Police that chose to be paid in "bitcoins" has a problem since today the founder of that site shut the web site down and disappeared with all the funds.This is the problem with being paid in anything other than US Currency. Oh well, it was fun while it lasted.

Ima Leprechaun @ 2/25/2014 10:35 AM

Sorry I meant to say county not country it was a typo.

Ima Leprechaun @ 2/25/2014 10:35 AM

There are a lot of typos, my bad. I wish there was spell check on here.

Bman @ 2/25/2014 6:13 PM

It is widely known among most police officers that take home cars last longer, run better, are in better condition overall and help reduce crime in localized areas. I would not work for an agency that did not assign a take home car. For one, I take way too much pride in my cars cleanliness and orginization for it to be ruined by swapping out cars every night with different people. Some big cities would rather have fat union overtime benefits that lead to big debt and lay offs over investing in take home cars. I don't think they realize how positive a take home car is for them financially (agency budget and personal), the community seeing more police cars and better maintained ones at that, and Morale.

Jack Betz @ 2/25/2014 8:28 PM

I am very in favor of take home units, but I will also play devil's advocate and say that if I am off the clock and have family in the car and see a rather blatant violation I would not be to keen on doing a traffic stop.

Ima Leprechaun @ 2/26/2014 7:12 PM

I cannot see how any unionization has a thing to do with take home cars. Most agencies with take home cruisers do not require Officers to do traffic enforcement off duty or to even wear a uniform. They are only requested to assist in real emergencies and to drop their passengers off at a safe place before responding. Calling in minor problems via radio is the simplest way to extend coverage and not intervene in minor situations or endanger family members.

kev cop @ 2/26/2014 7:24 PM

We in Phx and surrounding agencies have been on again and off again with take home vehicles. Never did patrol get them, only Detectives for call out and motors. The motors were required to write tickets to and from home. In either case the vehicles could NEVER be used for ANY personal use at all. So for most part sat in garages and or parked in street. Im retired now and with a County agency and we have take homes but with the same no personal use restrictions. I guess its a gasoline savings argument. penny wise, safety foolish.

kev cop @ 2/26/2014 7:28 PM

Problem with some states one would have to report the use of the vehicle as a benefit and pay taxes on that benefit. Honestly it is a benefit since you do save on gas and vehicle expenses to and from work and IF you get personal use out of it and its worth several thousand $ to you per year. Perhaps we should allow all cops to have the take homes and personal use but have a "car allowance" sort of tax which may make the whole deal more acceptable to the public.

Ima Leprechaun @ 3/1/2014 2:05 AM

Rules in the south just don't exist. But the cars are for public and private use and they do both. They go to the grocery, the movies, to just shop in general. Even parked, that cruiser has tremendous benefits since the bad guys have no way to know if the person that goes with the car is on or off duty. But you go ahead and tell the IRS you have a take home car, there is no paper trail about take home cars anywhere in the south.

06cumminsman @ 3/12/2014 4:46 PM

Take home cars is good, the only place I'd see it as an issue would be the busy city's where parking is already a problem. Then I would see it as causing more problems than solutions. I've noticed that even the patrol car parked in the driveway will cause people to slow down when they catch sight of it.

Join the Discussion





POLICE Magazine does not tolerate comments that include profanity, personal attacks or antisocial behavior (such as "spamming" or "trolling"). This and other inappropriate content or material will be removed. We reserve the right to block any user who violates this, including removing all content posted by that user.
Get Your FREE Trial Issue and Win a Gift! Subscribe Today!
Yes! Please rush me my FREE TRIAL ISSUE of POLICE magazine and FREE Officer Survival Guide with tips and tactics to help me safely get out of 10 different situations.

Just fill in the form to the right and click the button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.

If POLICE does not satisfy you, just write "cancel" on the invoice and send it back. You'll pay nothing, and the FREE issue is yours to keep. If you enjoy POLICE, pay only $25 for a full one-year subscription (12 issues in all). Enjoy a savings of nearly 60% off the cover price!

Offer valid in US only. Outside U.S., click here.
It's easy! Just fill in the form below and click the red button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.
First Name:
Last Name:
Rank:
Agency:
Address:
City:
State:
  
Zip Code:
 
Country:
We respect your privacy. Please let us know if the address provided is your home, as your RANK / AGENCY will not be included on the mailing label.
E-mail Address:

Police Magazine