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Ind. Bill to Limit Electronic Surveillance by Police

March 28, 2014  | 

Indiana's Gov. Mike Pence signed a bill Wednesday that is intended to restrict the use of electronic monitoring devices by law enforcement officials, reports the Indy Star.

The new law, which goes into effect July 1, comes amid heightened privacy concerns over the role of government surveillance programs, including the National Security Agency's collection of email and phone records.

In Indiana, much of the debate has revolved around a suitcase-sized monitoring device known as a Stingray, which masquerades as a cell phone tower and can scoop up call and location data from hundreds of nearby cell phones in real-time.

House Bill 1009, authored by Rep. Eric Koch, requires law enforcement officials to establish probable cause and obtain a court order before electronically tracking the location of mobile phones or other cellular devices in real time.


Comments (2)

Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

DEADMAN @ 3/29/2014 5:26 PM

I have concerns about too much surveilance and overstepping privacy issues but i think this bill,while it might have had good intentions might screw up a current investigation or one in the future where a named suspect of kidnapping or child abduction is concerned and trying to locate that suspect in a timely manner.Nowhere is there any mention, in this article ,of any exception to the rule.Time could be a real factor in apprehending any suspect before harm comes to the victim.It seems like politicians just jumpingwith both feet before they realize the consequenses and i don't give any politician the benefit of the doubt,they are all useless at one time or another.

Jim B. @ 3/30/2014 7:01 AM

Deadman,

In the accompanying link to the Indy Star article there is more detail on the legislation. It states there is an exigency exception.

"There is an exception for "exigent circumstances," such as when people's lives are in immediate danger. But even in those cases, officers would be required get a court order based upon a finding of probable cause within 72 hours."

I think it sounds like a good law to me.

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