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Warrantless Surveillance Cameras OK, Fed Judge Rules

October 31, 2012  | 

Police are allowed in some circumstances to install hidden surveillance cameras on private property without obtaining a search warrant, a federal judge said Monday.

CNET has learned that U.S. District Judge William Griesbach ruled that it was reasonable for Drug Enforcement Administration agents to enter rural property without permission—and without a warrant—to install multiple "covert digital surveillance cameras" in hopes of uncovering evidence that 30 to 40 marijuana plants were being grown.

Yesterday Griesbach adopted a recommendation by U.S. Magistrate Judge William Callahan dated October 9. That recommendation said that the DEA's warrantless surveillance did not violate the Fourth Amendment, which prohibits unreasonable searches and requires that warrants describe the place that's being searched.

Read the full CNET story.

Comments (4)

Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Goldwing @ 10/31/2012 6:08 PM

But what about the 4th amendment and the constitution. I did take an oath to defend and uphold the constitution to the people of the United States. Does it matter any more?

The Fourth Amendment (Amendment IV) to the United States Constitution is the part of the Bill of Rights which guards against unreasonable searches and seizures, along with requiring any warrant to be judicially sanctioned and supported by probable cause. It was adopted as a response to the abuse of the writ of assistance, which is a type of general search warrant, in the American Revolution. Search and seizure (including arrest) should be limited in scope according to specific information supplied to the issuing court, usually by a law enforcement officer, who has sworn by it. The Fourth Amendment applies to the states by way of the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.

wolverinesrule @ 11/2/2012 9:05 PM

This ruling will test the boundaries of the Patriot Act and NDAA, because they were written to supercede the Constitution. Now it's time to see how far the powers that be can go and how much the people will let their freedoms get away from them. We are going backward in the name of going forward. With every rule there must be a precedence. Someone had to get the first speeding ticket. Driving is a privilege, not a right, because it is not in the Constitution. What happens when you write laws to by-pass the Constitution? To take over a country, you have to change the laws governing the people. MARXISM has reared it's ugly head.In the past it was easier to control a million people than to kill a million. Now it's easier to kill a million than it is to control a million. Globalism is coming.

wolverinesrule @ 11/2/2012 9:17 PM

I hope law enforcement and the military uses good judgement when the time comes for the government to turn against it's people. They have different rules than we do, because ultimately they are unaccountable for their actions.

wolverinesrule @ 11/2/2012 9:19 PM

Join Oathkeepers, look them up or even just look at their pages and videos. Very informative.

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