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Mark43's Cobalt software platform unites a set of law enforcement tools securely...

Transforming Police Reporting with Speech Recognition Technology

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Wednesday, November 28, 2018 -- 11:00 AM PT/2:00 PM ET

An exceeding number of police departments and law enforcement agencies, whose officers spend upwards of 3-4 hours a day completing incident reports and other time-sensitive paperwork*, are turning to smarter tools, such as speech recognition solutions, to help transform their police reporting workflows.

Join us on Wednesday, November 28, 2018 at 2:00 PM ET to hear why these law enforcement professionals are embracing smarter tools to complete higher-quality reports and move mission-critical information within the CAD/RMS faster and more efficiently – all by voice.

This discussion will provide you with an understanding of:

  • What law enforcement has to say about current reporting processes
  • Why officers, especially recruits, want smarter tools to help with police paperwork
  • Why manual reporting has a negative impact on report accuracy and productivity and can hinder criminal proceedings
  • How departments can speed up data entry within the CAD/RMs and move mission-critical information more accurately and efficiently
  • How speech recognition technology can help increase officer safety and improve situational awareness and productivity on patrol
  • Why embracing smarter technology increases community visibility, and minimizes costs

Learn how your department can make incident reporting faster, safer and more complete by registering for our webinar today.

*Role of Technology in Law Enforcement Paperwork Survey 

Speakers:

Eric La Scola, Product Marketing Manager, Dragon, Nuance

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Demystifying the Convergence of LTE and LMR Networks for First Responders

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Thursday, December 6, 2018 -- 11:00 AM PT/2:00 PM ET

Narrowband Land Mobile Radio (LMR) networks and user radio equipment have been the cornerstone of mobile communications for First Responders for decades. The trend from traditional analog to more robust wireless broadband networks in recent years has improved the overall accessibility but questions remain on whether the new networks can provide all the required capabilities First Responders need to do their job.

Increasing demand for bandwidth intensive applications such as video, advanced mapping and analytics, alongside critical voice communications has been driving adoption of broadband LTE cellular networks, such as FirstNet.

Join our panel of industry experts for this insightful 60-minute webinar as they discuss the critical differences between LMR networks and LTE networking, how these technologies can successfully co-exist, and explore the future of critical communications for First Responders.

In this webinar, you will learn:

  • Current and future industry trends for LTE and LMR technologies
  • Challenges and obstacles with the convergence of technologies
  • Real-life examples of successful hybrid communication strategies for First Responders
  • Recommendations for future proofing your agency; adoption of new technologies and how to bridge the gap

Speakers:

Tony Morris, VP North American Sales, Enterprise Solutions, Sierra Wireless

Jesus Gonzalez, Analyst II, Critical Communications, IHS Markit

Ken Rehbehn, Principal Analyst, Critical Communications Insights

Andrew Seybold, Senior Partner, Andrew Seybold Inc.

Product News

AT&T Begins 'Text To 911' Testing In Tennessee

October 05, 2012  | 

AT&T has begun working with public safety agencies in Tennessee to determine the best way to allow citizens to send SMS/text messages to 911 systems.

AT&T will work with the Tennessee Emergency Communications Board (TECB) to provide a "text to 911" trial service that would allow AT&T wireless users to send text messages to Tennessee 911 call centers, which are known as public service answering points (PSAPs).

The trial will use the existing ESInet and statewide IP network backbone (NetTN), which are key components in Tennessee's plan for next-generation 911.

While dialing 911 by phone remains the primary and preferred method to contact public safety agencies, the text-to-911 trial will enable PSAPs in Tennessee to begin receiving 911 SMS texts from AT&T wireless subscribers via ESInet. The trial will allow PSAPs to develop best practices and methods to receive and integrate these types of emergency communications in the future.

Over the past few years, Tennessee has invested in an advanced, statewide 911 IP (Internet Protocol) infrastructure. The text-to-911 trial will utilize concepts and designs from key industry groups working on text-to-911 standards and will leverage the National Emergency Number Association's (NENA) i3 standards and recommendations, according to AT&T.

Related:

Tennessee Highway Patrol Selects Motorola for $39M Radio Project

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Comments (2)

Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

David @ 10/9/2012 6:28 AM

You are asking for nothing but trouble if this is allowed. You will be inviting more and more "Swatting" incidents. Swatting is where these punks utilize text messages now across the nation to falsly summons law enforcement swat teams to storm a residence. The unfortunate thing is nothing is going to be done about this until someone gets killed.

Sarah Grover @ 10/13/2012 11:40 AM

Are you kidding? S.W.A.T.-ing? REALLY?!?!?! What about people who are deaf or hard of hearing that have absolutely NO WAY to call 911? Use your head to think there... Yes, there may be a few incidents... But at the Virginia Tech. incident in 2007, students tried to text 911 so as not to give their location away, but let LEO know something was awry... it was failure... what about in a situation where someone enters a home? Text to 911 would be useful... it's quiet... say they then get kidnapped? The phone is in their pocket... maybe they can't text now... but they can be traced as long as their phone is being texted to... I see this as being more good than bad...

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