FREE e-Newsletter
Important News - Hot Topics
Get them Now!

Top News

St. Louis Ward Hopes To Cut Crime 70% with Wireless Surveillance

August 26, 2011  | 

St. Louis city and police officials have installed a new wireless video surveillance system in the 21st Ward, and have set a goal to reduce crime by 70 percent. Of the 28 wards in the city, the 21st Ward is the first to deploy this type of solution.

The system has been added to reduce violent crime and drug activity. In 2010, there were 14 homicides in the ward. City leaders are elected from the wards, while the St. Louis Metro Police Department divides the jurisdiction into nine policing districts.

The surveillance system, which was installed with the help of ADT Commercial, operates on a wireless mesh network designed with Firetide. The 21st Ward plans to deploy 14 Panasonic IP pan/tilt/zoom (p/t/z) cameras throughout the area in phases. Police officers will view video feeds using an OnSSI platform featuring video analytics at the ward's newly created police substation, which features a multiscreen workstation. The workstation includes a graphical map application that visually signals when there is significant activity in a certain area.

"Currently we have six cameras up on one of our main streets," Alderman Antonio French tells Security Sales & Integration, a sister publication of POLICE. "Three more will go up by the end of this week at another one of our hot spots. Then we'll add four in our major park, and we'll just continue to expand this thing."

Shortly after his election, French approached City Hall officials in December 2009 to begin the program; however, it took 18 months to get off the ground. Prior to the cameras, the subdivision relied on "old school policing" to handle crimes, French says. Unfortunately, when crimes occurred, many witnesses followed the "no snitching" rule, which oftentimes made it impossible for police to close some of the cases.

"Of the 14 murders we had last year, at least a dozen of them are still unsolved because no one comes forward," French says. "One of the cases involved a woman - a mother of four - who was used as a human shield in broad daylight. There were so many people out there, but nobody came forward."

ADT was one of the highest bids for the project. However, because of the company's customer service history, the 21st Ward signed a contract with ADT that includes a three-year maintenance agreement.

The system has already paid off for the 21st Ward. Roughly 72 hours after the first phase's completion, police used the cameras to solve an abduction case that occurred outside of a local store.

Funded by the 21st Ward's One-half Cent Ward Capital Improvement Program, the $400,000 system has helped the subdivision stay on track to reduce crime. In fact, the ward has already seen an 80-percent drop in homicides this year, French says.

By Ashley Willis

Tags: Video Surveillance, Crime Trends


Be the first to comment on this story





POLICE Magazine does not tolerate comments that include profanity, personal attacks or antisocial behavior (such as "spamming" or "trolling"). This and other inappropriate content or material will be removed. We reserve the right to block any user who violates this, including removing all content posted by that user.

Other Recent News

Salt Lake City PD Rape Data to Go Online
Salt Lake City Police Chief Chris Burbank put forward his "Code R Kit Project," which...
FLIR Debuts New PathFindIR Night Vision Camera
FLIR Systems has released its new PathFindIR II thermal night vision system to be used in...
Image Sensing Systems Releases New Mobile LPR Camera, Partners with MAV Systems
Image Sensing Systems has released its new compact license plate recognition (LPR) camera,...
5.11 Announces New Permanent Badge Technology for Its Apparel
Public safety apparel and accessories manufacturer 5.11 Tactical has announced the ability...

Get Your FREE Trial Issue and Win a Gift! Subscribe Today!
Yes! Please rush me my FREE TRIAL ISSUE of POLICE magazine and FREE Officer Survival Guide with tips and tactics to help me safely get out of 10 different situations.

Just fill in the form to the right and click the button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.

If POLICE does not satisfy you, just write "cancel" on the invoice and send it back. You'll pay nothing, and the FREE issue is yours to keep. If you enjoy POLICE, pay only $25 for a full one-year subscription (12 issues in all). Enjoy a savings of over 60% off the cover price!

Offer valid in US only. Outside U.S., click here.
It's easy! Just fill in the form below and click the red button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.
First Name:
Last Name:
Rank:
Agency:
Address:
City:
State:
  
Zip Code:
 
Country:
We respect your privacy. Please let us know if the address provided is your home, as your RANK / AGENCY will not be included on the mailing label.
E-mail Address:

Police Magazine