FREE e-Newsletter
Important News - Hot Topics
Get them Now!

Cobalt Software Platform - Mark43
Mark43's Cobalt software platform unites a set of law enforcement tools securely...

Transforming Police Reporting with Speech Recognition Technology

Brought to you by:

Register now!

Wednesday, November 28, 2018 -- 11:00 AM PT/2:00 PM ET

An exceeding number of police departments and law enforcement agencies, whose officers spend upwards of 3-4 hours a day completing incident reports and other time-sensitive paperwork*, are turning to smarter tools, such as speech recognition solutions, to help transform their police reporting workflows.

Join us on Wednesday, November 28, 2018 at 2:00 PM ET to hear why these law enforcement professionals are embracing smarter tools to complete higher-quality reports and move mission-critical information within the CAD/RMS faster and more efficiently – all by voice.

This discussion will provide you with an understanding of:

  • What law enforcement has to say about current reporting processes
  • Why officers, especially recruits, want smarter tools to help with police paperwork
  • Why manual reporting has a negative impact on report accuracy and productivity and can hinder criminal proceedings
  • How departments can speed up data entry within the CAD/RMs and move mission-critical information more accurately and efficiently
  • How speech recognition technology can help increase officer safety and improve situational awareness and productivity on patrol
  • Why embracing smarter technology increases community visibility, and minimizes costs

Learn how your department can make incident reporting faster, safer and more complete by registering for our webinar today.

*Role of Technology in Law Enforcement Paperwork Survey 

Speakers:

Eric La Scola, Product Marketing Manager, Dragon, Nuance

Top News

Arizona Sheriff Equips Deputies with Biometric Readers

July 19, 2011  | 

<p><em><strong>Screenshot: Fox News.</strong></em></p>

In the fall, Pinal County (Ariz.) Sheriff's deputies will be outfitted with hand-held devices that enable deputies to scan a subject's face and iris to find potential matches with people in criminal databases to combat smuggling.

The devices, which are slightly larger than a pack of cigarettes and attach to an iPhone, allow an officer to scan a subject's face from five feet away or scan an iris from six inches away. The scanners can also capture fingerprints, record audio and store video footage.

Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeu is currently using the technology in his 1,500-bed jail for inmate processing, and views it as a leading-edge technology that eventually will see more wider acceptance in law enforcement.

"Throughout America, this is the wave of the future," Sheriff Babeu told POLICE Magazine. "This is going to help us make sure not only that we have the right person, but that we're releasing the right person."

Law enforcement agencies in 47 states are already using the technology in corrections facilities, and Sheriff Babeu believes he's the first to give it to patrol officers.

BI2 Technologies is supplying Sheriff Babeu with 75 hand-held readers, which are known as Moris, for Mobile Offender Recognition and Information System. The device will arrive in September with a card reader, allowing a deputy to swipe the driver's license or ID of a subject.

Sheriff Babeu financed the $250,000 purchase from a $1.7-million border-security grant he received from the state earlier this year to combat drug and human smuggling. Eventually, Sheriff Babeu believes the technology will better secure borders and other entry points.

"Immediately you see you're dealing with a very serious threat not only to our citizens and families but also to our nation," Sheriff Babeu said about the smugglers operating in his jurisdiction. "I pray to God that Homeland Security is looking at this technology to better protect our ports, borders and airports."

The sheriff eventually hopes to roll out the biometric devices to all of his 214 sworn personnel.

By Paul Clinton

Related: Massachusetts' Agencies Use iPhones For Field IDs

Request more info about this product / service / company


Be the first to comment on this story





POLICE Magazine does not tolerate comments that include profanity, personal attacks or antisocial behavior (such as "spamming" or "trolling"). This and other inappropriate content or material will be removed. We reserve the right to block any user who violates this, including removing all content posted by that user.

Other Recent News

Arizona Agency May Soon Have Gun-Mounted Video Cameras
The camera automatically starts recording when an officer draws the gun from the holster.
Law Enforcement Embracing Computer Voice Stress Analyzer Technology
Innocent people are being exonerated in record numbers as new technologies such as DNA...
Telit LM960 mPCIe LTE Module Joins the FirstNet Lineup
Telit, a global enabler of the Internet of Things (IoT), has announced that its LM960 PCI...

Police Magazine