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Transforming Police Reporting with Speech Recognition Technology

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Wednesday, November 28, 2018 -- 11:00 AM PT/2:00 PM ET

An exceeding number of police departments and law enforcement agencies, whose officers spend upwards of 3-4 hours a day completing incident reports and other time-sensitive paperwork*, are turning to smarter tools, such as speech recognition solutions, to help transform their police reporting workflows.

Join us on Wednesday, November 28, 2018 at 2:00 PM ET to hear why these law enforcement professionals are embracing smarter tools to complete higher-quality reports and move mission-critical information within the CAD/RMS faster and more efficiently – all by voice.

This discussion will provide you with an understanding of:

  • What law enforcement has to say about current reporting processes
  • Why officers, especially recruits, want smarter tools to help with police paperwork
  • Why manual reporting has a negative impact on report accuracy and productivity and can hinder criminal proceedings
  • How departments can speed up data entry within the CAD/RMs and move mission-critical information more accurately and efficiently
  • How speech recognition technology can help increase officer safety and improve situational awareness and productivity on patrol
  • Why embracing smarter technology increases community visibility, and minimizes costs

Learn how your department can make incident reporting faster, safer and more complete by registering for our webinar today.

*Role of Technology in Law Enforcement Paperwork Survey 

Speakers:

Eric La Scola, Product Marketing Manager, Dragon, Nuance

Top News

U.S. Supreme Court Allows PDs to Search Officer Pagers

June 17, 2010  | 


Photo via Flickr.com (Just Nick...).

A California police department did not violate the privacy of a SWAT sergeant, when it reviewed text messages sent using his department-issued pager, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled today.

The Ontario Police Department fired Sgt. Jeff Quon after an internal audit determined he had sent a flurry of personal text messages using his department-issued pager. The ruling does not cover private companies.

The case came about after the agency's wireless carrier, Arch Wireless, provided transcripts of Quon's messages from August and September of 2002, after the sergeant exceeded his monthly allowance on multiple occasions. The department, which did not obtain a warrant prior to the search, determined that many of Quon's messages were not work related, and some were sexually explicit.

The matter was referred to internal affairs, which completed an investigation. Quon was then fired.

The court today unanimously ruled the search to be reasonable and in keeping with the Fourth Amendment, which "guarantees a person's privacy, dignity, and security against arbitrary and invasive governmental acts," according to the ruling.

The court ruled the chief-ordered audit was justified because the agency was seeking to determine whether its messaging plan met the needs of the department, due to the overages, the court ruled.

Messages sent by Quon while off duty were redacted and not reviewed by the department, and the court found that Quon's behavior established a "limited privacy expectation" due to the personal nature of the messages sent while on duty.

Read the New York Times coverage of the ruling.


Comments (3)

Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

mtarte @ 6/17/2010 6:58 PM

It is unfortunate for the sergeant to have lost his job, but in reality, what is the difference between any piece of department equipment? If it was his personal device used for work, the department would not have had a leg to stand on. What got him fired was his stupidity, not a violation of his non-existent privacy.

bcmc25 @ 6/17/2010 7:04 PM

If it's not work related then don't do it, it's not rocket science. Do what your suppose to do not what you want to do and things should be somewhat better.

mwbear772 @ 6/18/2010 5:10 AM

I have to agree. If you have a "Work" phone, pager, computer, pda, etc... you just don't use it for personal messages. If you do, with the understanding of the department, then you need to keep it short and clean.

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