FREE e-Newsletter
Important News - Hot Topics
Get them Now!

DrugTest 5000 - Draeger Safety Diagnostics Inc
In the past, roadside drug screening has been difficult because it involved the...

Exclusive Webinar!

Originally aired: June 17, 2014  ● 2PM EST

View Webinar Archive Here

Integrated Law Enforcement Complements and Completes Law Enforcement Capabilities

Discover how the combination of intelligence analysis, lead generation, agency collaboration, and communications integration can help you uncover issues faster and take action sooner. Learn how innovative IBM law enforcement solutions can extend the capabilities within your organization to deal with new and emerging threats, improve officer safety, reduce criminal activity, and protect the public. 

Join IBM industry expert Stephen Dalzell and members from the MDPD, IT and homeland security departments of the Miami Dade police department to hear more!

Click here to view archive

 

Top News

Three Officers Inducted Into IACP/Dupont Kevlar Survivors Club

November 09, 2006  | 

At this year’s IACP show in Boston, Officer Daniel Starr (Houston PD), Det. Daniel Sivori (Connecticut State Police) and Officer John Wrigley (Chicago PD) were inducted into the Survivors Club, which now includes more than 3,000 members who were saved from death or injury by wearing ballistic vests.

Since their debut in the mid 1970s, bullet-resistant vests have had a profound impact on the law enforcement profession. Body armor has led to improved officer safety and survival, but 40 percent of American law enforcement officers today still do not routinely wear a vest while on duty.

Knowing that officers are likely to be influenced by their peers on this issue, the IACP/DuPont Kevlar Survivors Club was formed in 1987 to recognize officers who survived potentially fatal or disabling injuries as a result of wearing body armor, with the hope that these survival stories would inspire more officers to wear vests.

Houston Senior Officer Daniel Starr never routinely wore a protective vest until his chief, Harold Hurtt, implemented a mandatory vest wear policy for the department on November 1, 2005. This past August Officer Starr was pursuing two armed men outside a Houston-area apartment complex when he was struck twice in the upper left torso with a .380 caliber pistol. Both bullets were stopped by Starr’s vest, quite likely saving his life.

On the night of March 14, 2006, Det. Daniel Sivori and two fellow officers were regulating construction traffic when two suspects fleeing an armed robbery became trapped by the traffic congestion. The officers engaged the suspects, but as the driver of the vehicle was being handcuffed, the suspect in the passenger seat raised his pistol. One of the officers on the scene jumped into the vehicle to subdue him, at which point he sustained a gunshot wound. Sivori quickly moved to assist his fellow officer and was subsequently hit by two bullets, the second of which struck him in the center of the chest. The second bullet was stopped by his body armor, thereby allowing Sivori to remain on the scene and help safely extract the wounded officer from the vehicle. Sivori and the other officer are now recovering.

“Like a badge, body armor should be considered an essential part of the law enforcement officer’s uniform. You can never know what may happen out there and wearing a vest provides an additional layer of protection that can mean the difference between life or death,” says Sivori.

On the night of February 21, 2005, Officer John Wrigley and his partner observed a vehicle being operated without lights and traveling the wrong way on a one-way street. When they stopped the vehicle, the driver became verbally abusive and then began shooting at the officers. When the shooting subsided, four officers sustained injuries including Wrigley who was struck twice - in the left forearm and in the upper left torso. His ballistic vest stopped the second bullet. Wrigley and the other officers were transported for medical care, where they were treated for various injuries and released. The suspect is awaiting court action on charges of attempted murder of police officers.

"Wearing protective body armor is the single most important thing an officer can do to reduce the risk of injury while on duty. I know because a vest saved my life," says Wrigley.

For information on the IACP/Dupont Kevlar Survivors Club program visit www.dupont.com/kevlar/lifeprotection/survivors.html.

Request more info about this product / service / company


Be the first to comment on this story





POLICE Magazine does not tolerate comments that include profanity, personal attacks or antisocial behavior (such as "spamming" or "trolling"). This and other inappropriate content or material will be removed. We reserve the right to block any user who violates this, including removing all content posted by that user.

Other Recent News

TCI's New CIPS 'Covert In Plain Sight' Kit Connects Patrol Radio to Standard Earbuds
TCI's new CIPS ("Covert In Plain Sight") Communications Kit for police officers allows...
JVC Introduces Private Mesh Video Network at NAB 2015
JVC Professional Video will unveil the JVC Private MESH Video Network at the 2015 NAB Show...
IWI to Introduce eLog Digital Solution for Small Arms Management
IWI's eLog is a new solution for digitizing the performance of every weapon system. It...
Streamlight Debuts Portable Power Unit to Charge Lights, Devices
Streamlight Inc., provider of high-performance lighting and weapon light/laser sighting...
Pelican Products Announces Pelican ProGear Smartphone Cases for Samsung Galaxy S 6 and Galaxy S 6 Edge
Pelican Products, Inc., known for its design and manufacture of high-performance rugged...

Get Your FREE Trial Issue and Win a Gift! Subscribe Today!
Yes! Please rush me my FREE TRIAL ISSUE of POLICE magazine and FREE Officer Survival Guide with tips and tactics to help me safely get out of 10 different situations.

Just fill in the form to the right and click the button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.

If POLICE does not satisfy you, just write "cancel" on the invoice and send it back. You'll pay nothing, and the FREE issue is yours to keep. If you enjoy POLICE, pay only $25 for a full one-year subscription (12 issues in all). Enjoy a savings of nearly 60% off the cover price!

Offer valid in US only. Outside U.S., click here.
It's easy! Just fill in the form below and click the red button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.
First Name:
Last Name:
Rank:
Agency:
Address:
City:
State:
  
Zip Code:
 
Country:
We respect your privacy. Please let us know if the address provided is your home, as your RANK / AGENCY will not be included on the mailing label.
E-mail Address:

Police Magazine