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Tucson (Ariz.) PD's SWAT Team  

August 1, 2005

By Bryn Bailer

Sgt. Robert Allen, weighed down in 50 pounds of tactical ballistic assault gear, has a reporter in his office, a lieutenant standing in the doorway, a ringing cell phone in one hand, and a three-wire mic at his left ear, listening to the Tucson Police Department SWAT team prepare for deployment.

SWAT Snipers  

August 1, 2005

By David Griffith

For as long as most active SWAT operators have been police officers, there has been one gospel truth about SWAT sniper operations: the 70-Yard Rule. Ask any SWAT sniper what is the average range of a police sniper shooting, and he will answer, “About 70 yards.” Ask him the source of his data, and he will say, “FBI statistics.”

A Solid Foundation  

August 1, 2005

By Bob Galvin

Whatever the nature of a tactical callout, one thing is sure—you’ll be on your feet and they need to perform. After all, your feet are as much a “tool” as the rest of your equipment. If you have taken as much care with the selection of your boots as you have with the rest of your gear, you should be able to get through any callout in good condition.

How to Start a Crisis Negotiation Team  

August 1, 2005

By David J. Terestre

When on scene, most tactical teams contain more testosterone than a crowd at a British soccer match. But there is one balancing element that keeps it all in perspective. The crisis negotiation team steps up to play a vital role in this very real life-or-death game of wits.

Combating Conditioned Hesitation  

July 1, 2005

By Michael Andrew Lord VanBlaricum

There are many factors that can lead to an officer hesitating in the kill zone. Any hesitation in a crisis situation can potentially cost an officer his or her life. Factors contributing to this problem include but are not limited to training, the officer’s level of physical fitness, the officer’s mindset and attitudes, suspect/subject factors, and fear.

Bushmaster Firearms A2 .308 Caliber Carbine  

June 1, 2005

By Mike Detty

It’s no wonder that the AR-15 rifle, in all its incarnations, has become so dominant in the law enforcement patrol rifle market. It’s lightweight, accurate, possesses little recoil, is easy to maintain, and has plenty of capacity.

Don't Go With Them  

May 1, 2005

By R.K. Campbell

One of the most difficult situations that an officer can face is a confrontation with an individual who wants to die. These extremely dangerous people fall into three primary classes: terrorists on a suicide mission, criminals who won’t be taken alive, and emotionally disturbed people who want to take their own lives and choose a police officer as their unwitting accomplice.

TREXPO West 2005  

May 1, 2005

By David Griffith

On the patio outside the Long Beach Convention Center there was a clear reminder of what the conference/trade show inside was all about. There, the Long Beach Police Department parked three tactical vehicles, and officers attending the recent Tactical Response Expo (TREXPO) West show had to pass by each to get into the doors.

Beyond the Darkness  

May 1, 2005

By David J. Terestre

Around midnight. Aug. 13, 2003. Officer Kyle Olinger of the Montgomery County (Md.) Police Department patrolled the central business district of Silver Spring.

Market Report  

May 1, 2005

By Shelly Feuer Domash

Economically speaking, street drugs and club drugs are commodities. They are mass-produced products subject to fluctuations in price due to changes in supply and demand. The way you track the demand on a commodity is to check its market value. But there’s no organized commodity market for illegal drugs, so to gauge demand you have to do a little research, you have to talk to the people who know the drug market.

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