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Denver Police Release 27-Page Use-of-Force Policy

August 08, 2018  | 

After more than a year and a half workshopping their “force related policies” with community stakeholders, the Denver Police Chief Paul Pazen unveiled his department’s final document to them on Monday.

The 27-page document outlines proper use of weapons, scenarios in which officers should use them and how incidents should be reported after the fact. It also specifies that officers involved in shootings are prohibited from immediately viewing video evidence, according to Denverite.

In 2016, when then-Chief Robert White announced the new policy would be penned, community groups made it clear they wanted a seat at the table as the document came together. In January 2017, White announced they’d have their shot. In the months since, a small group of civilian representatives have been providing input and fighting for changes.

Pazen said the entire force should be trained in the new standards by the end of the year. In 2019, more intensive training will take place for all officers. That next stage will include an emphasis on simulator training using the department's new VirTra V-300 system.


Comments (7)

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Jon Retired LEO @ 8/8/2018 3:42 PM

Wonder who is paying for all the lolipops that they are going to be throwing at all the criminals.

Alan @ 8/8/2018 5:01 PM

Any policy that needs 27 pages is badly written. Use of force policy needs to be simple, understandable and be general enough to adapt to the multitude of situations in which an officer must make that split second decision. Scenarios and examples are best left to lesson plans in training so that they may be changed as needed to adapt to legal decisions, etc.

kevcopaz @ 8/8/2018 5:20 PM

I realize there is only so such space to write an article, but there could have been some example of the policy, say examples of procedures that are excessive restrictive? Not the norm for the industry etc. This article gives zero information. The new policy could be the same as many cities and Denver just was behind the tines or (my guess) the new policy is too restrictive, cumbersome and will not work. Which is it? The reader is left to guess on their own.

Tom ret @ 8/8/2018 6:59 PM

27 pages for a use of force policy is a recipe for officer inaction and/or hesitancy.

Jim Barrett @ 8/8/2018 9:44 PM

27 pages of buses the officer can be thrown under. Not to mention the plausible deniability for thedept to hide behind. Civilans involved? Recipe for disaster.

David R McConnaughey @ 8/9/2018 6:43 AM

Lesson: Ala Homer Simpson, "Can't win, don't try." Time for everyone on that department to retire, resign, join another department, or better yet, learn a whole new career until today's panty-waist, PC politicians decide they need police officers to work in their police departments instead of empty chairs, and patrol cars gathering dust while rusting away. Just let us know when you've had enough chaos, bedlam and murder, re: Chicago, Baltimore, Detroit, Gary, Washington DC, ect.

Editor @ 8/9/2018 9:21 AM

@kevcopaz

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