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States Ask, How High Is Too High to Drive?

May 08, 2014  | 

With the push to legalize marijuana surging in popularity, states want to assure the public that roads will be safe, reports McClatchy. But they face a perplexing question: How stoned is too stoned to drive?

"The answer is: Pretty damned stoned is not as dangerous as drunk," said Mark Kleiman, professor of public policy at the University of California, Los Angeles, who served as Washington state's top pot consultant.

He said Washington state has a law that's far too strict and could lead to convictions of sober drivers, with many not even knowing whether they're abiding by the law.

With no conclusive research, states are all over the map as they try to assess intoxication by measuring blood levels of THC, the main ingredient in marijuana.

"The problem is that science is lagging really far behind with drugs versus alcohol," said Diane Goldstein, a former police lieutenant and a member of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, a pro-legalization group that opposes zero-tolerance laws.


Comments (3)

Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Ima Leprechaun @ 5/8/2014 4:56 PM

When reaction time is restrained then the amount is too much. Problem would be that level would be different per person. The best answer is any amount is too much. Driving stoned or drunk at any level is dangerous because you are knowingly breaking the law that protects others. It would be like a person that has never consumed alcohol, any level is too high. I have stopped non-drinkers with a BAC of .03 that couldn't stand up and I have stopped alcoholics with a BAC of .20 that appeared perfectly normal. I never liked a per se level anyway. The original law was clear and to the point., If driving is impaired and the driving is such to be dangerous to the public or themselves they are considered under the influence of an intoxicant and unfit to drive. This is the best answer to fit everyone.

GP Cobb @ 5/10/2014 7:05 AM

It is clear, at least to me, some don't know the difference between an 'alcoholic' and a 'drunk'.
The first I am, the second I am not.
Sad illiterate society we live in.

JP Bernhardt @ 5/15/2014 7:40 AM

Alcoholics go to meetings (AA); drunks go to parties! Your mental faculties definitely have to be alert to drive a motor vehicle.

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