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ACLU Claims NJ Cops Misuse Informants

June 28, 2011  | 

The American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey has slammed the state's law enforcement agencies' use of criminal informants in a newly released report.

The report, which came after a three-year investigation by the ACLU, claims New Jersey agencies have a disjointed, confusing, and, in some cases, nonexistent policies on how New Jersey law enforcement agencies use confidential informants.

The report claims that "innocent civilians may also find themselves under immense pressure to give federal, state, or local authorities information about the criminal activities of their neighbors, friends, or family members," according to the report. "The findings indicate that fear of criminal prosecution, monetary incentives and other inducements may motivate both criminal suspects and non-criminals to provide information that is not totally accurate."

Of the 93 municipal police agencies contacted, 21 said they had no policy on CIs, according to the ACLU. Many county prosecutors and police departments said they go by the state attorney general's policy, but cited different manuals as that policy's source.

Within the 82-page reports, the ACLU issued 10 pages of recommendations for developing a single, uniform policy to train all law enforcement officers who use confidential informants.

Read the full ACLU report.


Comments (2)

Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Morning Eagle @ 6/29/2011 12:50 AM

This is great news! One of the most anti-American, pro criminal rights and politically correct organizations in the country is volunteering their unquestionable expertise in law enforcement techniques to a state to "assist" in writing policies on CI operations. Perhaps there are some problems in NJ but letting the ACLU be part of the solution would be a huge mistake. Ever hear of the phrases, 'the camel's nose uner the tent' or 'letting the enemy get a foot in the door'? They need to be told no thanks and exactly what they can do with their 10 pages of recommendations. Will NJ's top cops have the nerve to do that? We’ll have to wait and see.

AMERICAN @ 6/30/2011 11:59 AM

I agree, why is the ACLU even given an ear? They ARE NOT law enforcement, nor do they know what they are arguing most of the time. In thew jails they walk in and try to intimidate officers like they are the cops! hahaha...and they do it with permission of law enforcement "leaders"!!! Hope NJ had the backbone to say "NO"!

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