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Workplace Communication: Closing the Generation Gap

Understanding generational differences can help everyone work together better.

February 17, 2011  |  by Amaury Murgado - Also by this author


Traditionalists (born before 1945)

This group is practical, patient, loyal, and hardworking. They are rule followers and respectful of authority. Their world was shaped by their parents, whose values go back to the 1800s. This generation experienced the Great Depression and World War II. With regard to trust, they take their time in developing relationships and their word is their bond.

Traditionalists are also called the silent generation. They don't share their thoughts right away. They like formality whether in oral or written form. This group draws lines in the sand and expects you to honor them. This generation is strongly influenced by family and religion. Though most of this generation is retired, the ones still working are in senior positions and wield considerable power. This group accounts for approximately five percent of the workforce. Their need for social order is often viewed as being biased, prejudiced, or sexist.

Traditionalists Tips

1. They prefer face-to-face or written communication.

2. They don't like their time wasted.

3. When speaking, focus on your words. Cut back on body language.

4. Use a historical perspective as they prefer what has worked in the past.

5. They have a high work ethic, which doesn't include having fun at work.

Baby Boomers (1946-1960)

This generation did not go through as hard a time as their parents. The Traditionalists wanted their children's lives to be better than theirs and gave them the best of what they could. As a result, boomers developed the importance of "me." This group grew up during a time of prosperity (1950s) and also in times of social upheaval (1960s). This was the first group to feel a shift in family values. The concept of marriage as an institution started changing. The boomers account for the largest group comprising approximately 45 percent of the current workforce.

While their parents worked for the benefit of the company, the boomers work for the benefit of the individual. It was the boomers that started the workaholic trend. The difference in perspective between Traditionalists and Baby Boomers is that Traditionalists worked hard because it was the right thing to do. Baby Boomers work hard to be successful and get to the next level.

Boomers embrace the team concept and tend to shy away from the more rigorous structure of their parents' companies. They don't like rules for the sake of having rules and tend to challenge the system. Boomers are very accepting of others as long as they can perform to their standards. They are very competitive and will fight for a cause.

Baby Boomer Tips

1. They are the "show me" generation, so body language is important.

2. Avoid controlling language as it turns them off.

3. Answer questions thoroughly and expect to be asked for details.

4. They like options in their thinking and don't like being boxed in.

5. Recognition is important, so provide it often.

Tags: Verbal Communication, Best Practices, How-To Guides


Comments (2)

Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Chief054@cox.net @ 2/18/2011 9:56 AM

Wow, a carefully spelled out generation by generation brief with a generation pros and cons and how to deal with them. This goes in the front of my Note book as a reference source when dealing with the different groups within any agency. It is concise and very knowledgable.

Fortunately he hits the highs and lows and tells it like it is when the tire hits the road. "You do it my way, until you get your own platoon!" He doesn't cover or apologize for his style, which is so nice to see in this world of Political correctness! I hate Political correct Officers, supervisors, and department heads. They make the job so much harder by adding trivial guidelines to an every changing profession. It always begs the question "Have they ever worked the street before?"

I can remember being told I was the problem, because Nuclear Scientist's don't lie! So in other words I was the liar because I was a cop. It amazed me how being a doctor, lawyer, or someone in position always caused a rift between a supervisor trying to appease them and the officers they had working for them.

Davesam25G @ 5/19/2011 8:28 PM

Well DONE!

Gee this is like a walk down memory lane...fit's both the offensive and defensive issues needed as a leader-supervisor! There is a time and place for some humor to relieve the high stress operations tempo - the old candy jar on my desk which one of the troops relabeled after see all the folks coming in with the emotions (she relabeled it) with another name…Did one of those assessments where the troops rate you, their only gripe with me was I was too serious (I can live with that)! Of course they got me with humor when rotating assignments…some of the statements were Original founder of the (P) jar Official acquaintance of Buddy Holly…and my all time favorite yes I had the flat butt syndrome even with a good belt - so they put on it hey Dave – Pull your pants up! Now there was a conspiracy here within the unit -when I processed out Colorado Springs for Reassignment to South Korea and it also happened at retirement- past follows you from the HQ Section, As I walked out of commanders office – Hey Dave pull up your pants – the First Sgt same thing, and then to top it off the commander’s secretary – yes same…I turned to them all gathering and laughing and blamed it on my mom!

The bottom line Lt. Amaury Murgado; Sir this was a needed best practice and it is in the toolbox for future use!! Thanks!!

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