FREE e-Newsletter
Important News - Hot Topics
Get them Now!

Departments : Shots Fired

Shots Fired: College Park, Maryland 11•06•2006

A desperate call from a home invasion victim sent three officers into a pitched backyard battle.

August 19, 2009  |  by - Also by this author

Somebody in the Woodline

As rounds flew back and forth before him like some ballistic tennis match, Soden got back to his feet and into the fight. Lining up his sights on the suspect nearest him, he fired.

One suspect fell but immediately got back to his feet even as yet another suspect exited the house. All three suspects split up, running in the general direction of the backyard and into darkness.

Davis spotted one of them as the man darted to the left and rear of he and Watkins for a thicket. Realizing that the man had offset his cover and concealment, Davis did a one-eighty and went prone.

"There's somebody in the woodline!" he yelled to Watkins.

But Watkins' attentions were frustratingly divided on multiple fronts. He was worried about his friend Soden, he was trying to update and coordinate responding units, and he was trying to deal with what appeared to be a group of victims now exiting the house. Watkins' only response to Davis was to curse his friend and tell him to shut up.

No Further Movement

Things were becoming a first-class mess as Lt. Eric Fatsinger arrived.

As suddenly as it'd started, the firefight had stopped. Soden told the lieutenant that he thought he might've been hit, and the two men looked for wounds. But the absence of any bullet holes and the presence of an upended lawn chair suggested that Soden hadn't so much been shot as he'd wrenched his back when he fell over backward.

Meanwhile, Davis maintained his vigil of the brush. He didn't know what was going on, but speculated that the suspect was lying low so as to pick up he and Watkins in his sights once they stood up or otherwise moved. But even with the arrival of other officers on scene, there was no further movement in the brush.

Still, no one was going to be taking anything for granted just then and as Davis kept a vigil on the spot at the woodline, Watkins and Soden detained the group at gunpoint and proned them out on the ground. Once they'd verified that these were the victims, the officers turned their collective attentions to the woodline.

Lt. Fatsinger decided to expand the inner perimeter and requested a K-9 check of the brush.

As aero did a FLIR sweep of the area from overhead, the K-9 alerted to something down the street: a suspect hiding beneath a car.

A 19-year-old suspect had been hobbled by a bullet to the hip. Reports say that at one point he had also apparently attempted to get into a motel down the street with a large quantity of drugs.

In due time, officers also found the body of Miles Johnson at the hedgerow line. Struck by a bullet that severed his femoral artery, the 27-year-old had bled out as he lay in the bushes, a loaded .357 caliber handgun and a large amount of illegal drugs and money discarded nearby.

A third suspect-the man Soden had actually initially exchanged rounds with-got away. A review of Davis' patrol car video camera revealed a suspect running past his unit and disappearing, never to be seen again.

Medals for Valor

Looking back on the incident, Soden notes that so much of what he'd read and heard about gunfights came into play that morning.

"Auditory exclusion, the slowing of time, distance distortion, time speeding up-it was all there." And it occurred over 10 seconds of sustained gunfire among six individuals. When the confrontation was over, approximately 50 rounds had been discharged.

In such sustained and close range combat, it was the officers' training that made the difference.

"They came out shooting, all three of them," Soden says. "They showed no hesitation, no respect for the law, and no respect for human life. We didn't have time to do anything other than what we were trained to do. We had spent countless hours in the academy preparing to be officers, countless hours in in-service training, countless hours preparing to act in stressful life or death situations, controlling our emotions. We were all on auto pilot."

Davis did not experience the same degree of physiological responses as Soden during the shooting. But that's not to say that the night's events didn't leave an impact on him.

For months afterward, he had difficulty sleeping. Night after night, his mind concerned itself with the implications of the outstanding suspect. Would he come back for vengeance?

Intellectually, Davis knew it wasn't likely. But his emotional concern for his loved ones would find him getting up four or five times a night to investigate any sound.

A psychiatrist prescribed some sleeping pills, which Davis refrained from taking. He didn't want to become dependent on some artificial stimulus for sleep. And in time, his sleep patterns improved on their own. Still, it was not an easy period, and there were times he was worried that it would be his wife beating him to death for the nocturnal forays that disturbed her sleep, too.

Already good friends, the three men have grown even tighter since the incident. In a way, they even believe that the lack of available manpower on scene was a blessing in disguise as it minimized the prospect for crossfire and friendly fire casualties.

Soden, Davis, and Watkins were each awarded their department's Medal of Valor for their actions in College Park that night.

They continue to serve the community of Prince George's County today.

«   Page 2 of 2   »

Tags: Shots Fired, Hostage Situations, Awards and Honors

Request more info about this product / service / company


Be the first to comment on this story





POLICE Magazine does not tolerate comments that include profanity, personal attacks or antisocial behavior (such as "spamming" or "trolling"). This and other inappropriate content or material will be removed. We reserve the right to block any user who violates this, including removing all content posted by that user.

Other Recent Stories

Williamsburg: Policing Where the Present Meets the Past
A former NYPD cop, Hamilton moved to this quiet Tidewater community more than 15 years ago...
Dealing with Confirmation Bias
One of the biggest things you can do to correct confirmation bias is to try to disprove...
Good, Bad, and Awful News: A Month on the Job
Each week, the staff here at POLICE posts a couple dozen or more news items on...
Policing Tourist Areas: Working Where Others Play
Law enforcement officers who work in tourism towns have a two-fold mission, protecting the...
Tactical Medicine in Transition
So if emergency medical response during critical incidents is now going to be performed by...

Get Your FREE Trial Issue and Win a Gift! Subscribe Today!
Yes! Please rush me my FREE TRIAL ISSUE of POLICE magazine and FREE Officer Survival Guide with tips and tactics to help me safely get out of 10 different situations.

Just fill in the form to the right and click the button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.

If POLICE does not satisfy you, just write "cancel" on the invoice and send it back. You'll pay nothing, and the FREE issue is yours to keep. If you enjoy POLICE, pay only $25 for a full one-year subscription (12 issues in all). Enjoy a savings of nearly 60% off the cover price!

Offer valid in US only. Outside U.S., click here.
It's easy! Just fill in the form below and click the red button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.
First Name:
Last Name:
Rank:
Agency:
Address:
City:
State:
  
Zip Code:
 
Country:
We respect your privacy. Please let us know if the address provided is your home, as your RANK / AGENCY will not be included on the mailing label.
E-mail Address:

Police Magazine