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U.S. Armor Comfort Advanced Cover System (ACS) Carrier

Moisture-wicking and antimicrobial properties combined with a two-way stretch fabric make this ballistic vest carrier comfortable and virtually odor-free.

March 01, 2007  |  by - Also by this author

Southern California-based U.S. Armor has been around for more than 20 years and prides itself on reliability. If U.S. armor makes a change, it's for a good reason. Following on the heels of the company's newly redesigned logo and Website, U.S. Armor's new concealable vest carrier provides enhanced comfort by utilizing new materials and ergonomic designs.

"We've been working with high-end, high-tech fabric suppliers in the industry to put together the best combination of fabrics that will give the best enhanced performance for a standard carrier," says U.S. Armor General Manager Georg Olsen.

Available only on the company's Enforcer XLT line of concealable armor, U.S. Armor's new Advanced Cover System (ACS) carrier incorporates several new technologies that make it stand out.

"On the outer side of the vest carrier, we're using antimicrobial closed-hole mesh fabric with built-in two-way stretch," says Olsen. "It stretches more in one direction than it does in another to allow for more fluid movement when you're wearing it. We wanted to add a material that would facilitate the body's natural movement rather than fight it, as conventional materials do."

The material on the inside or "body side" of the carrier is vented to allow positive airflow through the fabric. Akwadyne wicks away moisture to the edge of the garment so it can dissipate into the environment as vapor without ever allowing liquid to touch the vest panel, which could adversely affect performance.

Not content to merely change the fabric, U.S. Armor also reworked the shape of both the carrier and its straps.

For starters, a new "easy access" closure system allows for simplified panel removal. Its new position away from the body frame as well as pull tabs take the hassle out of removing panels so you can wash the carrier.

U.S. Armor's new "comfort curve" padded shoulder strap system provides enhanced weight distribution as well as cushioning for enhanced comfort during long-term wear. Traditional ballistic carrier straps are straight across the shoulders. But the shape of these wider padded straps is slightly curved along the neckline and collarbone to more accurately follow the natural body line.

To further customize the carrier to make it fit each officer's body type and wear preference, two sets of straps come with each carrier. In addition to the six-point elastic and Velcro straps (two on the shoulder and two on each side) that come standard, the Comfort ACS also comes with a four-point wide-wrap waist strap at no additional charge.

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