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Beretta says its new Pico is the thinnest .380 auto made. The snag-free Pico's slide and frame are a true 18 millimeters at their widest point. The grip frame, sights, and caliber (go from a .380 to a .32ACP by changing the barrel) are all simple to modify. The chassis can accommodate a Lasermax Laser frame and be customized with a selection of colored frames.

SHOT Show 2014

We sent Police Magazine contributing editor Mark W. Clark to the SHOT Show in January and he came back with these shots of guns and gear from Media Day at the Range and from the show floor.

Fremont (Calif.) Police Officer Todd Young plans to return to chasing high-risk suspects, after he recovers from multiple surgeries. He plans to pass the department's SWAT obstacle course in late 2012 or early 2013. Photo courtesy of Todd Young.

Returning To Duty: Todd Young

Fremont (Calif.) Police Officer Todd Young returned fire, after a violent Norteno gang member fired 10 rounds at him at 2:30 p.m. Aug. 27, 2010 on a street in Oakland. Officers performed trauma care on Young and delivered him to Highland Hospital, where he received life-saving emergency medical care. He is now recovering and plans to rejoin the SWAT team later this year or in early 2013. We feature his story in the June 2012 "Shots Fired" and "Todd Young's Long Road Back."

The suspected Blood with the red hat is showing "westside" or "brims." The one in the middle using his right hand to show the same and his left hand to show "crip killer." The one with the black hat is showing "blood" or "piru."

East Coast Blood Hand Signs

Gang members use hand signs to communicate with each other and to challenge rival members or law enforcement officers in what they call "throwing signs." After forming in Los Angeles in the early 1970s, the Bloods street gang spread to the East Coast and formed "sets." These sets include the Piru Bloods, Fruit Town Brims, and South Side Brims (in western Maryland). The hand signs in this gallery were recovered during a multi-agency investigation earlier this year. Photos courtesy of Det. Rich Keys of the Maryland State Police.

Hot Wheels, No. 1: Honda offered its 1994 Accord in a coupe and sedan with a four-cylinder engine. The vehicle is still popular among gang members and street racers who typically "chop" the vehicle and sell off the parts or swap out the engine. Photo: Mad African!: (Broken Sword).

Hot Wheels: Most Stolen Vehicles

Each summer, two insurance-industry associations — the Highway Loss Data Institute and National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) — release lists of the top 10 vehicles stolen across the country in the prior year. For the fourth year in a row, the Cadillac Escalade was the most stolen insured vehicle, according to the institute, which lists only vehicles with theft coverage. The NICB's report is typically more comprehensive because it covers all stolen vehicles reported by law enforcement agencies, including those that are not insured. The 1994 Honda Accord, which could be worth about $2,000 on the open market in good condition, tops the NICB report. The 735,547 vehicles stolen in 2010 represents the fewest number of stolen vehicles since the 659,800 reported stolen in 1967.

Street gang members use a variety of edged weapons such as a fixed-blade knife, dagger, folding knife, butterfly knife, tomahawk axe, utility knife or shuriken (throwing star).

Edged Weapons

Gang members on the street and inside prisons acquire edged weapons to use in close-quarter attacks on rival gang members or law enforcement officers. Street gang members typically will use fixed-blade knives, daggers, folding knives, butterfly knives or other utility tools, while inmates fashion their own jail-made shanks and other weapons from boot reinforcements, bed wiring, and other materials. Don't miss POLICE gang expert Rich Valdemar's "Edged Weapons and Gang Culture" blog post.

The Atlanta Field Division of the DEA sent its Clandestine Laboratory Enforcement Team wearing white "bunny suits" to collect evidence from a clandestine conversion lab discovered in Gwinnett County, Ga.

Meth Superlab In Georgia

Take a closer look at the raid led by the Gwinnett County (Ga.) PD's Special Investigation Section of a meth house in suburban Atlanta that resulted in the seizure of almost a half-ton of methamphetamine with a street value of $44 million. Police arrested a Texas man in connection with the bust. Photos courtesy of Gwinnett County PD.

The federal Bureau of Land Management posts warning signs for tourists who would venture into the remote areas of southern Arizona's rugged, unforgiving desert.

How Cartels Smuggle Narcotics Into Arizona

Earlier this year, a regional SWAT team led by deputies with the Pinal County (Ariz.) Sheriff's Office took POLICE Magazine into the Vekol Valley in the Arizona desert to show one way smugglers bring narcotics across the U.S.-Mexico border. Smugglers often use illegal immigrants as drug mules to carry 25-pound marijuana bundles using makeshift "backpacks" of rope and cut strips of Mexican blankets to lessen discomfort. Listen to our podcast, "Tracking Smugglers in Southern Arizona," with Pinal County Sheriff's Sgt. Matt Thomas. Photos by Paul Clinton.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department confiscated this fake California Identification Card during an investigation. The IDs have since been given additional anti-forgery features, which can often be defeated by savvy counterfeiters.

ID Forgery Kit

Street gangs have become very adept at creating convincing false documents that can pass an officer's cursory inspection. Advanced computers, scanners, and color printers make detection more challenging, and traffickers often use fake birth certificates and other forgeries to obtain authentic state-issued documents. Biometric methods such as fingerprinting, retinal scans and DNA are a much more reliable way to identify suspicious people. Photos courtesy of Richard Valdemar.

One of the marine suspects was a military trained sniper who sported a prominent tattoo of a .50-caliber Barrett rifle. The suspect was taken into custody when the K-9 bit his left arm.

Tucson Home Invasions: Marine Double-Cross

Tucson PD officers responding to a suspicious-activity call of armed men in a residential alley were met with two heavily armed former marines just home from Iraq. According to the initial investigation, one marine double-crossed his buddy on a drug deal, by bringing in a third crew to rob the "hydro weed." One was a skilled markesmen with a heavy duty arsenal determined to fight, when the high-powered rifle malfunctioned. Responding officers used airborne and K-9 units to search unpaved alleys and scrub brush between the homes, where the suspects were eventually apprehended by the home invasion unit. Crime scene photos courtesy of Tucson PD.

Home invasions often don't involve traditional victims, since they are mostly armed robberies by drug crews who "rip" or "lick" narcotics and cash from each other.

Tucson Home Invasions: The Missing Man

In the south Arizona drug trade, armed home invasions usually differ from other robberies because police don't have a traditional victim or witnesses. They can be dynamic, armed confrontations in the middle of the night between drug crews looking to heist drugs and money. View crime scene photos from one case, in which the Tucson PD's home invasion special investigative unit arrived to find a blood-stained driveway, spray of rifle rounds embedded in doors and walls, as well as a pair of ostrich boots. Photos courtesy of Tucson PD.

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