FREE e-Newsletter
Important News - Hot Topics
Get them Now!

Top News

Feds Say Baltimore Cop Sold Heroin at Station, Ran Ring

July 20, 2011  | 

A Baltimore Police officer who allegedly ran his own drug ring at one point brazenly sold heroin at the parking lot of the Northwestern District Station while in uniform, according to a federal indictment.

"The allegations against Daniel Redd are an affront to and undermine the integrity of the hard working men and women of the Baltimore Police Department," said Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld, III. "When allegations of potential misconduct surfaced, the Baltimore Police Department immediately launched a comprehensive investigation and partnered with the FBI and United States Attorney's Office. We will not tolerate corruption among our ranks."

In addition to Officer Daniel Redd, 41, four others were indicted on drug and gun charges. Other defendants arrested include Abdul Zakaria (aka "Tamim Mamah"), Shanel Stallings (aka "Bit"), Dyrell Garrett (aka "D"), and Malik Jones.

"As evidenced by this indictment and other recent cases throughout the state, the Department of Justice continues to make rooting out corruption at all levels one of its top criminal priorities," said FBI Special Agent in Charge Richard McFeely. "It is even more egregious that much of this illegal trafficking was allegedly being conducted by an officer who was sworn to stop the very activity he now has been charged with."

Investigators believe Redd, a uniformed patrol officer in the Northwest District of Baltimore, and Zakaria headed the drug organization. The affidavit alleges that Zakaria and others obtained heroin from suppliers in Africa and distributed the heroin to customers, including Redd, Garrett, and Jones. Redd allegedly distributed the heroin to others, including Stallings.

Police records reveal that Redd was on duty at the time of several of the calls. On March 31, Redd provided heroin to Zakaria in the parking lot of the Northwest District Station, while wearing his full police uniform.

Each defendant faces life in prison for conspiring to distribute heroin. Redd, Zakaria, and Garrett face up to 40 years for possession with intent to distribute 100 grams or more of heroin. Redd, Zakaria, and Stallings also face a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison for possession with intent to distribute heroin and Redd faces a maximum sentence of life in prison on each of three counts for carrying a firearm in relation to a drug trafficking crime.

"The Baltimore Police Department initiated this investigation and has been a full partner in this and other pending federal cases involving allegedly corrupt police officers," said U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein.

Tags: FBI, Drug Trafficking, Baltimore PD


Comments (1)

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Morning Eagle @ 7/21/2011 8:22 PM

Hopefully they will all be promptly convicted and receive the maximum sentence on each count without possibility of parole and that the sentences will run sequentially, NOT concurrently. Considering the damages done by heroin to peoples' lives, Redd ought to be looking at a death sentence since he was operating this ring while in a position of public trust.

Join the Discussion





POLICE Magazine does not tolerate comments that include profanity, personal attacks or antisocial behavior (such as "spamming" or "trolling"). This and other inappropriate content or material will be removed. We reserve the right to block any user who violates this, including removing all content posted by that user.

Other Recent News

California Supreme Court Upholds Death Sentence for 1997 Deputy Murder
The California Supreme Court upheld the death sentence for a man convicted of the 1997...
2 Officers Wounded, Suspect Killed in Texas Standoff
Hildalgo County, Texas, authorities say a gang member wanted for capital murder was killed...

Get Your FREE Trial Issue and Win a Gift! Subscribe Today!
Yes! Please rush me my FREE TRIAL ISSUE of POLICE magazine and FREE Officer Survival Guide with tips and tactics to help me safely get out of 10 different situations.

Just fill in the form to the right and click the button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.

If POLICE does not satisfy you, just write "cancel" on the invoice and send it back. You'll pay nothing, and the FREE issue is yours to keep. If you enjoy POLICE, pay only $25 for a full one-year subscription (12 issues in all). Enjoy a savings of nearly 60% off the cover price!

Offer valid in US only. Outside U.S., click here.
It's easy! Just fill in the form below and click the red button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.
First Name:
Last Name:
Rank:
Agency:
Address:
City:
State:
  
Zip Code:
 
Country:
We respect your privacy. Please let us know if the address provided is your home, as your RANK / AGENCY will not be included on the mailing label.
E-mail Address:

Police Magazine