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From left to right, John R. Ramsey, FLEOA's national vice president for membership benefits; Kathyrn Downey, trooper with Massachusetts State Police; and Jon Adler, FLEOA's national president.

Federal LEO Association Conference

The Federal Law Enforcement Officers Association (FLEOA) recently held its 2010 national conference in Henderson, Nev. FLEOA is a volunteer organization that provides legal assistance and representation for its members. Federal officers do not have union support like municipal, county, and state law enforcement officers, so FLEOA fills this need for its members and advocates for legislation important to them. In fact, FLEOA's unified voice led to the Special Agent Samuel Hicks Families of Fallen Heroes Act being signed into law on June 1, 2010 (P.L. 111-178). These photos show some of the highlights of the FLEOA conference.

Practice knife-defense techniques using training knives and the appropriate protective gear. You'll want to learn how to use a knife, so you can defend against it. Get a few training knives and put yourself into a realistic situation with a determined attacker to test your defense move.

Surviving Edged Weapon Threats

Knowing how to effectively respond to an unexpected knife attack is a crucial officer-safety concern. If a suspect is further than 21 feet, you may be able to fire one or two shots, though you'll want to rotate off line to try to get out of the path of the incoming knife. To survive a deadly knife threat, know your tactics, study concealment, realize capabilities, learn knife fighting and develop basic knife defenses. Photos and captions by Al Abidin.

A person might seem to be innocently reaching for an ID, when in fact he's reaching for a gun.

How to Watch the Hands: 3 Scenarios

From basic training to field training, officers are told, "Watch the suspect's hands." But you are not taught how to do it. Why haven't law enforcement trainers developed an easily understandable method to teach you the specifics of hand-movement awareness? Mike "Ziggy" Siegfried explains how, and shows three scenarios – reaching for a gun, reaching for a knife, and reaching for a wallet to show ID. Also, please view "How to Watch the Hands" for an in-depth article on this topic.

For almost 20 years, Seagal has been working as a fully commissioned deputy who goes out on patrol with the Jefferson Parish Sheriff's Office in Louisiana. The show credits Seagal as an expert marksman who has worked with their SWAT team during firearms training.

Steven Seagal: Lawman

In his movies, Steven Seagal usually plays a special agent or cop with martial-arts skills who, when pushed to the edge by baddies, responds with deadly force. Turns out, Seagal knows more about law enforcement that we thought. For the past two decades, he's been working as a fully commissioned deputy with the Jefferson Parish (La.) Sheriff's Office. Here are a few images from his new police reality show, "Steven Seagal: Lawman," which debuts Dec. 2 on A&E. Images courtesy of A&E.

The newest player in the market is 5.11 Tactical with the Light for Life. This fl ashlight is a radical departure from your everyday light in that it has no batteries. Ivus Energy Innovations developed Flashpoint Power Technology, a way to allow a capacitor to "bleed" off its energy and run a light. It operates through the use of computerized digital circuitry and ultra capacitors, allowing the light to go from no charge to full charge in about 90 seconds. Because it can be recharged 500,000 cycles and has a bulb life of 50,000 hours, this could be the ideal light for your cruiser, station, or anywhere you want to ensure you have a light for daily or emergency use.

Duty Flashlights: 2009

A good duty light should be easily carried on a duty belt, provide adequate illumination up to 50 yards away, and be long enough that it protrudes from both sides of a fist so the light can act as a last-ditch impact weapon. The light should also be able to be used in conjunction with a sidearm in the Harries or Rogers technique. Xenon bulbs put out a tight beam and mega amounts of lumens; but they eat batteries and the lamp assemblies are expensive when you need a new bulb. LEDs, on the other hand, are rapidly approaching the light output of xenon at 50 yards or so. These models became available in 2009.

You'll need several pieces of gear to photographically document injuries. A digital SLR (single lens reflex) camera with a dedicated macro lens and ring flash system is preferrable. If a point-and-shoot is used, it needs an optical zoom lens, good built-in flash, a macro setting and flash control. Several scales can be effective, such as the ABFO (American Board of Forensic Odontology) bike mark scale for small injuries. Use a 90-degree scale for larger areas.

How To Photograph Injuries

Good photographs documenting physical injuries start even before the camera is out of the bag, because you need to have the proper mindset. These photos aren't just for police departments. They'll be viewed by the prosecutor, defense attorney, judge and, most importantly, the jury will scrutinize your work. Good composition, proper exposure and attention to detail speak volumes about your skill and dedication. Sloppy, out-of-focus images give the impression of incompetence.

The 5.11 XPRT (Extreme Performance for Rapid Tactics) Black Boot comes with a Sympatex waterproof-breathable membrane and protects against bloodborne pathogens. The boots feature 5.11's trademark Shock Mitigation System for reduced impact, composite Kick-Toe technology, and Talon Stabilizer ankle support.

Duty Boots: 2009

You might not be Cinderella or even Prince Charming, but you deserve a pair of boots that meets your finicky standards. Good looks are only part of the criteria that need to be met. Your boots should provide proper fit, comfort, and durability, in addition to any other personal preferences. New footwear styles for patrol include such features as side zippers, new waterproofing technologies, and improved shock absorption, not to mention good-looking designs.

This kick is very effective for stopping an assailant's forward progress or moving him backward. This also helps keep you outside of the attacker's punch range, adding to your safety. Duty boots increase the effectiveness of the technique. Finally, there is room for error with this kick, so even if you don't land the kick exactly, it may have the desired effect.

Using Your Foot

A swift kick can do wonders in a violent confrontation, but you have to know how to deliver it. Law enforcement agencies equip and train officers with pistols, rifles, shotguns, batons, OC, TASERs, canines, horses, basllistic shields, battering rams, emplty hand self defense, and countless other potentially dangerous law enforcement tools, but may be hesistant when an officer properly and justifiably uses kicks for self-defense or to subdue a suspect. The U.S. Supreme Court held in Graham v. Connor that the reasonableness of an officer's actions must be judged by the circumstances at the time the force is used. It did not restrict of limit the tactics that an officer can employ.

5.11's Revolution Holster is a secure level 1 retention holster, producing an audible click as your sidearm seats. With the look, feel, and fit of a custom holster, the resilient Revolution Holster offers high-impact strength and withstands variable weather conditions beyond 300 degrees Fahrenheit. Also, the special slick-surface polymer doesn't wear the finish of your gun. A positive lock trigger guard and adjustable tension screws are standard. Each holster comes with an adjustable belt loop and paddle. Crafted in the United States, the Revolution Holster is right-handed, comes in 14 styles, and accommodates 30 gun models.

Duty Holsters: 2009

With all of the duty holsters available today, it's amazing to think the only option for police officers used to be black leather. Now there's also laminate, nylon, and all manner of synthetics. For finish there's basketweave, plain, or high gloss. Not to mention increasingly innovative retention devices in holsters from level 1 to 3. Here's a selection of holsters for duty carry encompassing all of these variations.

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