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Carrick Cook

Carrick Cook

Officer Carrick R. Cook is the Public Information Officer for the Arizona Department of Public Safety and a former motor officer with that agency.



Doug  Wyllie

Doug Wyllie

Doug Wyllie has authored more than 1,000 articles and tactical tips aimed at ensuring that police officers are safer and more successful on the streets. Doug is a Western Publishing Association “Maggie Award” winner for Best Regularly Featured Digital Edition Column. He is a member of International Law Enforcement Educators and Trainers Association (ILEETA), an Associate Member of the California Peace Officers’ Association (CPOA), and a member of the Public Safety Writers Association (PSWA).
Vehicles

What a Motor Officer Sees

This POV video from the 2010 Police Motor Rodeo in Pasadena (Calif.) puts you in a motor officer's seat.

June 29, 2010  |  by


Warning: Do not read this blog post, if you easily experience feelings of dizziness.

Every now and again a video comes along that puts you in someone else's shoes, giving you the opportunity to experience something from a different point of view. Their point of view.

This can be fun!

We recently posted a video submitted to PoliceMag.com (from in-car video supplier Digital Ally) that gave us this thrill. To produce the video, Digital Ally added its FirstVu wearable/mountable video system and camera to the motorcyle of Pasadena (Calif.) PD's Eddie Chan, a motorcycle skills champion.

We watch, as Chan bobs and weaves his way through the pathway of orange and yellow cones, leaning his bike into the curves.

Of course, the cameras are usually mounted lower to the ground, rather than to the officer's helmet, but this video gives a fairly good approximation of what a motor officer sees while riding a cone pattern.

Buckle your seatbelts and keep your hands inside the cart to watch this one, ladies and gentlemen. Watch the video here.


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