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Brian Cain

Brian Cain

Brian Cain is a sergeant with the Holly Springs (Ga.) Police Department, and is known as the "Millennial cop" on Twitter. He has been in law enforcement since 2000. He hosts and produces a podcast for Millennials in law enforcement.

Michael Bostic

Michael Bostic

Mike Bostic, of Raytheon Corp.'s Civil Communication Solutions group, specializes in open architecture, systems integration of communications and data programs. Mike spent 34 years with the LAPD. He managed IT and facility development, as well as the SWAT Board of Inquiry, which developed new command-and-control systems.

Blog - Technology

Displaying 11  -  20  of  98
<p>Infographic via <a href=&quot;; target=&quot;_blank&quot;>Flowtown</a>.</p>

How Boomers and Gen Y Can Bridge the Tech Gap  

September 18, 2013
Technology is catching up with the demands of the profession, and the Gen Yers are very adept at using that technology. With baby boomers at the helm of most law enforcement agencies, the technology isn't being used to its full potential.
<p>Photos by Paul Clinton.</p>

Officer Connectivity On Display at APCO  

August 27, 2013
On-body video systems, broadband LTE networks and hardware, P25 Phase 2 radios and even biometric monitoring systems are entering the market at a rapid clip to help law enforcement officers gather intelligence and quickly process that information in a command center.
<p>Photo courtesy of Mike Bostic.</p>

Connecting Smartphones To a Police Radio Network  

August 15, 2013
Raytheon has developed one of the nation's first strictly IP-based interoperable dispatch systems supporting smartphones and tablets working with Twisted Pair Solutions, a Seattle-based provider of mission-critical solutions for secure, real-time communication.
<p>Apple&#39;s Steve Jobs demonstrates iCloud in June 2012. Photo via Netaberisha/Wikimedia.</p>

Relying On the Cloud  

August 8, 2013
Finding and prosecuting threats to our communities is one of the more important examples of knowledge work in the world today. There is a growing urgency for us to leverage these technology trends within the law enforcement community.
<p>Photo courtesy of Vigilant Solutions.</p>

LPR Protects Officers and the Public  

July 15, 2013
Since our country's founding, personal freedoms have been in constant battle with the protection of the greater good. That battle continues today in Los Angeles as some privacy rights groups attempt to limit the tools that law enforcement uses every day to keep the public safe.
<p>Photo courtesy of Panasonic.</p>

On-Officer Video Systems  

July 8, 2013
The following is a quick look at some of the leading models of on-officer video cameras.
<p>Screenshot via Purple Forge.</p>

4 Useful Law Enforcement Apps  

June 10, 2013
As smartphones and other mobile devices become more prevalent in law enforcement, officers search for reference apps that quickly bring actionable information to the field.

Twitter Comes of Age for Law Enforcement  

May 21, 2013
One of the most lasting lessons that came out of the way law enforcement handled the Boston Marathon bombing came in the Twitterverse, where the Boston Police Department provided a clear beacon for using the social media platform.
<p>Photo via Flickr.</p>

Using a Photo's Meta Data To Find a Location  

May 10, 2013
Within most digital pictures, cameras store meta data called EXIF (Exchangeable Image File Format) within the header of the file. This data can give you major clues about the origin of the photo.
<p>Mobile forensic devices can extract data from seized cellular phones.<em><strong>&nbsp;</strong></em>Photo by Graham Kuzia.</p>

Handling Cell Phones and Their Digital Evidence  

April 18, 2013
Cell phones can provide investigators with a call history, text messages. and contact lists. They can also provide us with other valuable data that's sometimes overlooked.
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