FREE e-Newsletter
Important News - Hot Topics
Get them Now!
Weapons

Will LE Adopt the 'Smart' Rifle?

Two options have emerged that bring technology to bear on precision marksmanship.

June 17, 2013  |  by Lou Salseda - Also by this author

Photo courtesy of Tracking Point.
Photo courtesy of Tracking Point.

The military has long relied on the highly-trained sniper calculating his shot with minimal tools to keep it real for field work. Law enforcement agencies have also invested many hours of training so their snipers can master mil dots or other reticle-ranging systems to make accurate shots with minimal use of electronic aids.

A technology company based in Austin, Texas, hopes to change this status quo.

Tracking Point Innovations has mounted "smart" aiming technology to a custom rifle that includes a computerized 6-35X telescopic scope with heads-up display (HUD) linked to a "guided trigger," Wi-Fi server, microphone, compass, laser range finder, inertial measurement, ballistic calculator, tracking engine, and environmental sensors.

The technology enables operators to lock on a target and record a video of everything on the display with the help of an iPad or smart phone. The company boasts hits out to 1,200 yards every time. The complete package including a rifle and custom precision ammunition starts at $22,500!

Photo courtesy of Inteliscope.
Photo courtesy of Inteliscope.
Does the highly technical "smart" Tracking Point system mark a milestone breakthrough for LE and the avid hunter? When I questioned county and city SWAT operators, they responded with, "Maybe" and "We'll see."

Today's SWAT operator is highly technical and cross-trained in different operational areas that require many hours of training to maintain their certifications and proficiency. Their initial concerns about a "smart" rifle system fell into a few areas. First, will it hold up under hard use and then work as designed when they need it?  So it can improve the hit-to-miss ratio. Great, but is it worth it at that price tag? A SWAT sniper rifle dressed out typically costs between $5,000 and $7,000, and most LE agencies work on a fairly tight budget these days.

While a SWAT sniper's typical engagement distance is less than 100 yards, there is always the chance of a miss during a critical moment. A missed shot in a critical police operation can result in several disastrous outcomes, especially when hostages are involved. This "smart" optic will not let you break the shot until the threat is aligned with the system's optics technology unless manually switched off.  Again these are issues to weigh out before a "smart" rifle moves into the "got to have it" column.

Photo courtesy of Inteliscope.
Photo courtesy of Inteliscope.
Would a complete video of the shot be something beneficial to police personnel?  In today's environment, a video of almost any police action is typically captured from different media sources including the public's many cell phones that often don't accurately represent the officer's point of view. In-car police video has been a double-edged sword that's mostly benefitted law enforcement.  The graphic nature of a sniper shot could be disconcerting for the viewing public regardless of the circumstances.

If the $22,500 staring price is too high for police agencies, perhaps they would consider the less-expensive Inteliscope Tactical Rifle Adapter that turns your iPhone or iPod touch into a heads-up display with many of the same features as the Xact System. The Inteliscope app costs less than $100. You may not get the same long-range target lock accuracy but you can experience a similar smart-rifle system without the hefty price tag.

Tags: Police Snipers, Sniper Rifles, Tracking Point, Apps, Smartphones, Tactical Gear


Comments (2)

Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Trigger @ 6/20/2013 7:45 PM

Sounds like a cool piece of equipment, but what about some real world testing. I am not keen on the video, could cause a legal firestorm from some attorney or administrator.

OneShot @ 6/21/2013 6:26 AM

In theory it is a great idea, for all the old timers who remember manual Canon SLR's or stickshift hotrods, once you learn the basics it is easier to understand a digital camera or automatic transmission. The problem I see is, when the price becomes reasonable and these become popular, will the basics be taught anymore? How many young bucks know how to use or have even seen a manual SLR? In other words what happens when the technology goes down? Can you still hit your brain band or snap a spinal cord? Will it work in extreme conditions? Snow, Rain etc. Is it battle tested? Too many questions, not enough answers to line up at the manufacturers door step.

Join the Discussion





POLICE Magazine does not tolerate comments that include profanity, personal attacks or antisocial behavior (such as "spamming" or "trolling"). This and other inappropriate content or material will be removed. We reserve the right to block any user who violates this, including removing all content posted by that user.

Other Recent Blog Posts

What Went Wrong in Jersey City?
How did there become such a huge rift between the Jersey City police and the people that...
Warrior Tech's SafeCycle Chamber Verification Device
Warrior Tech, LLC took the chamber flag concept and improved upon it greatly. The...

Get Your FREE Trial Issue and Win a Gift! Subscribe Today!
Yes! Please rush me my FREE TRIAL ISSUE of POLICE magazine and FREE Officer Survival Guide with tips and tactics to help me safely get out of 10 different situations.

Just fill in the form to the right and click the button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.

If POLICE does not satisfy you, just write "cancel" on the invoice and send it back. You'll pay nothing, and the FREE issue is yours to keep. If you enjoy POLICE, pay only $25 for a full one-year subscription (12 issues in all). Enjoy a savings of nearly 60% off the cover price!

Offer valid in US only. Outside U.S., click here.
It's easy! Just fill in the form below and click the red button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.
First Name:
Last Name:
Rank:
Agency:
Address:
City:
State:
  
Zip Code:
 
Country:
We respect your privacy. Please let us know if the address provided is your home, as your RANK / AGENCY will not be included on the mailing label.
E-mail Address:

Police Magazine