FREE e-Newsletter
Important News - Hot Topics
Get them Now!
Paul Clinton

Paul Clinton

As the POLICE Web editor, Paul Clinton contributes posts about patrol cars, motorcycles, and other police vehicles. He previously wrote about automotive electronics as managing editor of Mobile Electronics. Prior to that, he was an award-winning newspaper reporter.



William Harvey

William Harvey

William "Bill" Harvey is currently serving as chief of police in south central Pennsylvania. He retired from the Savannah (Ga.) Police Department where he worked assignments in training, patrol, and CID. Harvey has more than 25 years of experience working with recruits, rookies, and FTOs.
Careers

Avoid Diploma Mills for Your Degree

All colleges are not created equal, and diplomas for sale will halt your police career.

September 12, 2011  |  by William Harvey - Also by this author

Earlier this summer, a police officer in New York was discharged because his college diploma didn't meet agency standards. Hey, wait a minute! All colleges are the same, right? Wrong. There are vast differences that you as an applicant must know.

First and foremost, if you're applying for a job with an agency that has an educational bonus pay program, read and fully understand their stated requirements. Granted, there are many agencies that require only a high school or GED. Since the employment market is getting so competitive, many are seeking higher education as a resume foundation. Make sure you're getting what you need to earn the position.

College accreditation is a mixed bag; I won't go into too much depth about this area. It can be confusing trying to separate "recognized" verses "accredited." To further confuse matters, national and regional panels weigh in on the matter. Determine what measure your agency recognizes and go to that panel's database to determine if your college or university meets their requirements. Colleges can have several different certifications; distance learning has created new frontiers. Most mainstream universities have online programs that usually meet the same requirements.

Some oversight is provided by the government, yet the U.S. Department of Education doesn't accredit educational institutions or programs.

The Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) database lists more than 7,800 degree-granting and non-degree-granting institutions and more than 19,700 programs that are accredited by organizations in the U.S. that have been recognized either by CHEA or by the Department of Education (USDE).

Traditional vocational schools and several religious certification programs spanning into new areas have convoluted the mix. In some cases, their trade or certification programs don't meet the requirements of an institution of higher learning. I'd be wary of any program that can certify you with a welding, ministry, and criminal justice degree in the same course load.

Granted, there are ever-present diploma mills that will accept your money and issue you a piece of paper. I once was involved in a promotional process where one applicant presented a bachelors and master's degree that he obtained in the same month! That's an aggressive educational track that immediately brought the board's scrutiny. When asked about this rapid achievement, he replied that if these diplomas weren't good enough he could get a doctoral degree if that would help him. We didn't promote this lad, and don't recommend his methodology of paying for a worthless diploma. 

Education is a self-perpetuating science. If you get one degree, then you need another, and so forth. Academia has always created its own job security in creating more degree programs to beget more future students. However, the criminal justice system we've had since the 1970s has encouraged rising educational requirements for officers in the quest of making this a true profession. Most professions have an academic standard they rest upon; we are no different.

There are always those who try to circumvent the system and purchase their degrees. For me, this is an integrity issue. If you took the low road on one requirement, what else have you shortchanged us on?

If you have your degree, I congratulate you. If you're seeking a degree, fully research and fully ensure that what you are seeking is a quality program. Do the research to be sure that your department will accept your credential. Don't try to buy your way in. You're only cheating yourself and wasting money.

Related: N.Y. Recruit Terminated for Non-Accredited Degree

Tags: Online Education, Higher Education, Background Investigations


Comments (3)

Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Mark Tarte @ 9/13/2011 6:42 PM

I am a college instructor. In a previous life, I was a cop. Now long retired. I have cautioned many students looking to move from our two year college to a 4-year college about diploma mills, and sometimes, as bad, for-profit colleges that suck out your last dime through iron-clad tuition contacts, whether you graduate or not. I've found that most legitimate colleges will say who they are accredited by and that is it. Most diploma mills and store front "colleges" will have an entire page on their site devoted to accreditation. Many times, the accreditation at these mills are made up by the "college" themselves or are of overseas origin. Don't waste your hard earned money on useless crap. While accreditation is voluntary, most credits from these "colleges" will not transfer to state schools and are no better than the paper they are printed on. For a good understanding of the scope of this problem, visit http://www.degree.net/ and look under "Diploma Mills."

copwriter @ 9/13/2011 11:12 PM

The CHEA accredits many schools that issue degrees that are not honored by traditional colleges. Although it sounds less prestigious, "regional" accreditation is superior to "national" accreditation. There is a list of regional accrediting bodies in the article listed here: http://is.gd/Ah9rZX. If you obtain credits from a school not accredited by one of these organizations, it is unlikely the credits will be accepted by legitimate colleges for credit or transfer, and any degree from that school is essentially worthless.

MPA @ 9/14/2011 8:42 AM

Here is a laundry list of fraudlent 'Accreditation Agencies' I found on www.geteducated.com:

•Accreditation Council for Distance Education (ACTDE)

•Accreditation Panel for Online Colleges and Universities (APTEC)

•Accrediting Commission International (ACI)

•American Accrediting Association of Theological Institutions

•American Council of Private Colleges and Universities

•American Association of Drugless Practitioners (ADP)

•Association of Accredited Bible Schools

•Association of Distance Learning Programs (ADLP)

•Association of Private Colleges and Universities

•Association for Online Academic Accreditation

•Association for Online Excellence

•Association for Online Academic Excellence

•Board of Online Universities Accreditation (BOUA)

•Council for Distance Education

•Council of Online Higher Education

•Central States Consortium of Colleges & Schools

•Distance Learning International Accreditation Association (DEIAA)

•Global Accreditation Bureau (GAB)

•International Commission for Higher Education

•International Accreditation Agency for Online Universities (IAAOU)

•International Accreditation Association for Online Education (IAAFOE)

•International Accreditation Commission (IAC)

•International Accreditation Commission for Online Universities (IACOU) (Kingston)

•International Accreditation Organization (IAO)

•International Council on Education (ICE)

•International Education Ministr

Join the Discussion





POLICE Magazine does not tolerate comments that include profanity, personal attacks or antisocial behavior (such as "spamming" or "trolling"). This and other inappropriate content or material will be removed. We reserve the right to block any user who violates this, including removing all content posted by that user.

Other Recent Blog Posts

Police Rifles: Why We Carry What We Do
Chief Michael C. Koval of the Madison (Wis.) Police Department recently wrote a post on...
Law Enforcement's—and Society's—Only Hope
Today, for the most part, the best and the brightest in law enforcement still run directly...

Get Your FREE Trial Issue and Win a Gift! Subscribe Today!
Yes! Please rush me my FREE TRIAL ISSUE of POLICE magazine and FREE Officer Survival Guide with tips and tactics to help me safely get out of 10 different situations.

Just fill in the form to the right and click the button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.

If POLICE does not satisfy you, just write "cancel" on the invoice and send it back. You'll pay nothing, and the FREE issue is yours to keep. If you enjoy POLICE, pay only $25 for a full one-year subscription (12 issues in all). Enjoy a savings of nearly 60% off the cover price!

Offer valid in US only. Outside U.S., click here.
It's easy! Just fill in the form below and click the red button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.
First Name:
Last Name:
Rank:
Agency:
Address:
City:
State:
  
Zip Code:
 
Country:
We respect your privacy. Please let us know if the address provided is your home, as your RANK / AGENCY will not be included on the mailing label.
E-mail Address:

Police Magazine