FREE e-Newsletter
Important News - Hot Topics
Get them Now!
Paul Clinton

Paul Clinton

As the POLICE Web editor, Paul Clinton contributes posts about patrol cars, motorcycles, and other police vehicles. He previously wrote about automotive electronics as managing editor of Mobile Electronics. Prior to that, he was an award-winning newspaper reporter.



William Harvey

William Harvey

William "Bill" Harvey is currently serving as chief of police in south central Pennsylvania. He retired from the Savannah (Ga.) Police Department where he worked assignments in training, patrol, and CID. Harvey has more than 25 years of experience working with recruits, rookies, and FTOs.
Careers

New-Hire Benefits: Read the Fine Print

Understanding the benefits of employment is more important than you think.

December 20, 2010  |  by William Harvey - Also by this author

Many of you are competing for the job of your dreams. With pending layoffs and many departments carrying vacancies due to the economy, it's making it all the more difficult netting the job. I wish the best for you, because we need good young men and women filling our ranks.

One thing police applicants fail to do is read the fine print — all your focus is on getting the job, and the rest will work itself out. Stop and read the fine print!

Many agencies are changing their benefits due to the economy. Some are even changing benefit packages for future hires, so if a cop tells you about how good his or her benefits may be for them, it could well be far different for you.

One of the biggest storm fronts on the human resources side is what are referred to as defined benefits plans. This is where the state or city commits to paying its employee a specific benefit for life beginning at his or her retirement. The amount of the benefit is known in advance and is usually based on factors such as age, earnings, and years of service.

Many states and cities are facing financial breaking points, and there is a push for defined benefit plan reforms. Many are looking at private contribution plans, more of a civilian cooperate model than the iconic government model.

The other is health insurance benefits and your contributions. If you have a family or are thinking about one, stop and read the plan. You could have a Preferred Provider Organization (PPO). This is health-care organization of physicians, hospitals, or others providing health-care services at a reduced fee. There are limitations or restrictions. Not all are bad, but if you don't live in your jurisdiction, this could pose an issue.

Did I mention where you live? Due to shrinking tax bases, there are some larger cities that desire, if not demand, that you establish residency within your jurisdiction. This has been fought many times over, but if it's required, can you afford to live there? Look at the cost of living and affordable housing on a rookie cop's paycheck.

Your personal time is now up to all kinds of schemes. Vacation, flex time, personal days, family days, sick days and comp-time plans. When are these days awarded, how many, when can you use what day and the list of questions goes on and on.

Whether the department offers life insurance is another perk you need to check out. None of us, when we started out in the career, even wondered about this, but when families and responsibilities land on you, you should weigh all options.

The human resources side of employment is always overlooked by the eager applicant, especially if this is 'the job' or you need the job. Be a smart applicant and take advantage of the offers. These are your earned benefits.

Tags: Retirement Benefits


Comments (1)

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

James R Scarborough @ 1/14/2011 10:58 AM

It's all to bad for the new officer when most men and women take the jobs not only because they truly want to help their communities, the benefits are excellent. So as municipalities begin to chop away at the benefits what's left? Not only will you not get good people to be police officers but you will get thugs with badges and one thing this nation does not need is that. So like the above article says read before you sign up. Check out other areas you may have to move from one city to another or one state to another. However it's a very good respectful,rewarding job.

Join the Discussion





POLICE Magazine does not tolerate comments that include profanity, personal attacks or antisocial behavior (such as "spamming" or "trolling"). This and other inappropriate content or material will be removed. We reserve the right to block any user who violates this, including removing all content posted by that user.

Other Recent Blog Posts

We Don't Need to Relax Recruit Fitness Standards, We need to Prepare Candidates Better
Fitness standards should not be lowered to accommodate anyone, male or female. The job is...

Get Your FREE Trial Issue and Win a Gift! Subscribe Today!
Yes! Please rush me my FREE TRIAL ISSUE of POLICE magazine and FREE Officer Survival Guide with tips and tactics to help me safely get out of 10 different situations.

Just fill in the form to the right and click the button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.

If POLICE does not satisfy you, just write "cancel" on the invoice and send it back. You'll pay nothing, and the FREE issue is yours to keep. If you enjoy POLICE, pay only $25 for a full one-year subscription (12 issues in all). Enjoy a savings of nearly 60% off the cover price!

Offer valid in US only. Outside U.S., click here.
It's easy! Just fill in the form below and click the red button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.
First Name:
Last Name:
Rank:
Agency:
Address:
City:
State:
  
Zip Code:
 
Country:
We respect your privacy. Please let us know if the address provided is your home, as your RANK / AGENCY will not be included on the mailing label.
E-mail Address:

Police Magazine