FREE e-Newsletter
Important News - Hot Topics
Get them Now!
Paul Clinton

Paul Clinton

As the POLICE Web editor, Paul Clinton contributes posts about patrol cars, motorcycles, and other police vehicles. He previously wrote about automotive electronics as managing editor of Mobile Electronics. Prior to that, he was an award-winning newspaper reporter.



William Harvey

William Harvey

William "Bill" Harvey is currently serving as chief of police in south central Pennsylvania. He retired from the Savannah (Ga.) Police Department where he worked assignments in training, patrol, and CID. Harvey has more than 25 years of experience working with recruits, rookies, and FTOs.
Careers

Learning to Dot the I's

A job application is the very first impression you make on an agency; make it understandable.

June 27, 2008  |  by William Harvey - Also by this author

I have written several times about the importance of making a favorable first impression. I've seen numerous glaring errors on job applications. Just one clouds the best applicants' chances and it is time for this madness to end.

The application is one item that will be before everyone in your selection process and then added to your permanent human resources file. In other words, everyone important will see it before they see you. Make it readable, clear, and correct!

Type or Print Clearly

If the application instructions state the information is to be printed or typed, do it. I was reviewing some applicant files with my executive assistant Michelle the other day and we made note of several errors that derail your application.

Print; this is a very simple direction. Notice I said "print." I have seen hieroglyphics, longhand (cursive), near doodles, and mixtures of all of these combined. Just print. And if you have the option to fill out your application online, do so.

Contractions, Acronyms, and Abbreviations

I usually don't allow these in most formal works. However, on an application your space is at a premium. Using an abbreviation for a state (GA, NY, etc.) or your degree (B.A., A.A., etc.) is fine, just as long as you use the accepted ones. Acronyms worry me. There has to be a billion of them and the very one you use may have multiple meanings. Yes, I have seen some self-made ones that set me to wonder.

Ink Selection

Most applications require black ink for ease of photocopying. Some may also allow blue ink. Read what the directions state. Under no circumstances should you ever use pastels, glitter ink, or other inventive ways to express yourself. Yes, I've seen these as well.

Clean and Professional

If you can make copies of the original, make good crisp ones for the presentation. Papers that are crumpled or covered with coffee or other stains that require DNA testing are not too professional. Keep it clean and professional. I have seen mistake cover-up liquid, correction tape, doodles, and my all-time winner…flowers with a happy face (this was an intern who did not get selected).

Good Copies of Documents

If the application requires you to attach copies of important documents, make good clear copies. Off-centered, too small (do not try to put all on one page), and out of focused copies may be rejected. Make sure you also write on any addendum papers your name, just in case they get jumbled.

Hint: If you are making several applications, take time, go to the copy store and make several copies of each important document. The most requested ones will be on hand for later applications. It saves you time and frustration.

Good Order or Good Riddance

If you have to prepare a packet, put it in order. The cover letter should be on the top, followed by the agency application. Follow with the copies in order of their request. If you do add a résumé, announce on the cover letter that it is attached.

The big secret on applications is two-fold. One, you want to make this process as easy as you can for those who process it. If they cannot read it, it is incomplete, or it is just so horrible to deal with, you are catching a ride on the rejection train.

Secondly, and most important, this is your first chance to impress others. The application does far more than offer the demographics and life history of the applicant. It tells me that you can follow directions, which is a sought after trait in a police officer.

Train hard, train smart and train like your life is on the line.

Tags: Job Applications


Comments (2)

Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

mark aronoff @ 7/3/2008 8:12 AM

Don't trust SPELLCHECK exclusively. Otherwise, you'll find yore self rowed to the store on a rocky rode to get a roe boat.

Steve Rothstein @ 7/3/2008 11:02 AM

One of the mistakes i have seen that is still relatively new but common is the e-mail address. We have received applications with email addresses like Biggun@xxx.xxx or supercop@xxxxx.xxxx.

Those cute e-mail addresses give a really poor impression when applying for a job. Get one that is your name or somthing very similar. Hotmail, Google, and Yahoo will all let you create an email account that can have a professional sound that will not embarass you during the job interview.

Join the Discussion





POLICE Magazine does not tolerate comments that include profanity, personal attacks or antisocial behavior (such as "spamming" or "trolling"). This and other inappropriate content or material will be removed. We reserve the right to block any user who violates this, including removing all content posted by that user.

Other Recent Blog Posts

The Aftermath of Police Encounters with “Unarmed” Individuals--57 Murders
According to the FBI’s online database of officers feloniously killed, as well as the...
We Don't Need to Relax Recruit Fitness Standards, We need to Prepare Candidates Better
Fitness standards should not be lowered to accommodate anyone, male or female. The job is...

Get Your FREE Trial Issue and Win a Gift! Subscribe Today!
Yes! Please rush me my FREE TRIAL ISSUE of POLICE magazine and FREE Officer Survival Guide with tips and tactics to help me safely get out of 10 different situations.

Just fill in the form to the right and click the button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.

If POLICE does not satisfy you, just write "cancel" on the invoice and send it back. You'll pay nothing, and the FREE issue is yours to keep. If you enjoy POLICE, pay only $25 for a full one-year subscription (12 issues in all). Enjoy a savings of nearly 60% off the cover price!

Offer valid in US only. Outside U.S., click here.
It's easy! Just fill in the form below and click the red button to receive your FREE Trial Issue.
First Name:
Last Name:
Rank:
Agency:
Address:
City:
State:
  
Zip Code:
 
Country:
We respect your privacy. Please let us know if the address provided is your home, as your RANK / AGENCY will not be included on the mailing label.
E-mail Address:

Police Magazine