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Breaking the Silence with Deaf Citizens  

April 1, 1996

You've made a traffic stop and the suspect does not respond to your verbal commands. He moves his index finger from his ear to his mouth. Then he begins to reach for the glove compartment. Many veteran patrol officers say they've had to forcefully arrest or almost tire their weapon under similar circumstances-only to discover the subject they thought was being aggressive or uncooperative was deaf or hearing impaired.

A Life-Threatening Meeting With Some Old "Friends"  

April 1, 1996

It was May 2, 1995, and my first night work­ing the graveyard shift with the Harvey (III.) Police Department. Harvey is a large suburb about 10 miles south of Chicago. I had already responded to several calls, including a high speed pursuit that started in Chicago with the Illinois State Police chasing a stolen vehicle. Nothing could have prepared me for my next call.

Decoding the Secret Messages on the Wall  

April 1, 1996

Obviously, not all graffiti is gang graf­fiti. But once you are able to decipher their source and secret mes­sages, graffiti becomes a useful source of information.

Enforcing Visitation Rights  

March 1, 1996

The law may support the non-custodial parent's right to visitation, but it is usually very time consuming, expensive and difficult to enforce. Often the father's problems start with the wording of the custody order, which is greatly compounded by the mother's lack of cooperation. Unless there's been child abuse accusations, the mother's actions are usually aimed at hurting the father. But in the long run, it's the children who suffer.

Freelancing for Fugitives  

March 1, 1996

If you think bounty hunters are mythical characters of the Wild West or figments of the imaginations of Hollywood scriptwriters, you'd better think again. The bounty hunter is alive and well in contemporary America.  The average fee for bringing in a bad guy runs between $400 and $600. Some par­ticularly high-profile cases can net $10,000 to $87,000 for an arrest.

Battles on the Homefront  

March 1, 1996

Twenty years ago, typical domestic violence calls were brushed off as trivial disputes to be settled behind closed doors. Police would either admonish the couple to stop fighting or try to mediate their dispute. By the late 1980s, however, states began to treat domestic violence as a crime rather than a private affair.

Putting Out the Fire  

March 1, 1996

Before you go scurrying to your training manuals to find out how some­one can be arrested for a felony when the basic crime is a misdemeanor, take a look at how San Diego (Calif.) police have managed to curb the number of domestic abuse homicides. Through an innovative domestic abuse policy, San Diego now has one of the lowest rates of domestic vio­lence homicides in the country.

Easing Investigations on the Gang Battlefield  

March 1, 1996

Photos, jewelry, hairstyles and body piercing are among the obvious physical traits investigators look for when profil­ing gangs. But understanding how the members think, act and feel also can help police develop a rapport with members, and in turn, help expedite gang-related investigations.

Incriminating Signs of the Rat Packs  

February 1, 1996

When citizens hear the word "gang," they usually conjure up stereotypical images of Hispanic, Asian, black or white thugs roaming inner-city streets. But most cops working the gang detail understand that looks can be deceiving.

Police Chaplains: Helping Hands  

February 1, 1996

Police Chaplain Phyllis Poe had been offering comfort and coffee last April at the Oklahoma City bomb site when a police officer, covered in dirt, approached her and said desperately, "You've got to pray with me."

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