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Roger served over 20 years with the NYPD, where he spearheaded the NYPD’s first dedicated facial recognition unit. The unit has conducted more than 8,500 facial recognition investigations, with over 3,000 possible matches and approximately 2,000 arrests. Roger’s enhancement techniques are now recognized worldwide and have changed law enforcement’s approach to the utilization of facial recognition technology.

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Fatal Errors: Surviving Arrest and Control  

January 1, 2005

By Gerald W. Garner

In the Southwestern U.S., a patrolman with about a year on the job was shot twice in the back of the head while transporting two robbery suspects in the back seat of his patrol car. The officer had failed to find a .380 caliber handgun concealed on one of the robbers. The officer died of the wounds he received in the 3:30 a.m. incident.

Fatal Errors  

January 1, 2005

By Gerald W. Garner

Making an arrest, engaging in a traffic contact, and intervening on the scene of domestic mayhem are, statistically, among the most dangerous things you can do. Make an error in your handling of one of these and you should anticipate a really bad day.

Fatal Errors: Car Stop Safety Tips  

January 1, 2005

By Dan Pasquale

Car stops are a daily occurrence for most patrol officers. Whether in a big city or out in the country, a traffic stop is at the very root of what we do. And like most activities that we consider “routine,” we can get a little complacent on traffic stops and put ourselves on “auto pilot” without even realizing it. That’s a bad move on our part.

How to Select and Train FTOs  

January 1, 2005

By Dean Scoville

Patrol training is the obligatory stepping stone to street work for many a new cop. It is weeks (or months in remedial cases) of short meals, long nights, and court in the morning. And this time spent with a veteran field training officer (FTO) can result in some of the most curious pairings of individuals since Pat Boone married himself to heavy metal. Still, this mentoring process is critical to the development of new officers.

Tags: FTOs

Fashion Forward  

January 1, 2005

By Melanie Basich

As a law enforcement officer, you most likely spend your days on duty wearing a uniform. Wearing the same outfit every day means you never have to worry about what you wear to work. But it also means that because you live in your uniform while on duty it better be comfortable and durable.

Outerwear for Any Weather  

January 1, 2005

By Melanie Basich

If freezing isn’t your idea of a good way to start the new year, you might want to take a look at the new outerwear offerings for law enforcement. Whether you’re bracing your body against snow, rain, or wind, winter can give you quite a chill if you don’t properly prepare yourself for the weather.

Pounding the Pavement  

January 1, 2005

By Melanie Basich

You might not be Cinderella or even Prince Charming, but you deserve a pair of boots that meets your finicky standards. Good looks are only part of the criteria that need to be met. Your boots should provide proper fit, comfort, and durability, in addition to any other personal preferences.

For Want of a Nail: Tom Ridge  

January 1, 2005

By David Griffith

It’s not his fault. But Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge has always reminded me of a particularly ineffective basketball coach at my college. The coach was universally known as a nice guy, and he had this “innovative” way of signaling what play he wanted his team to run by holding up brightly colored cards on the sidelines. Heck, Ridge even looks a little like the guy. Which in my memory is not good. We went 4 and 26 that year.

Emissive Energy Inova T3 Flashlight  

January 1, 2005

By Scott Smith

One of the areas of duty gear that has experienced a quantum leap in technology over the last few years is the flashlight, especially lightweight ultra powerful LED lights. Times have really changed from the days of the silver aluminum Eveready light.

i2 Inc Visual Notebook  

January 1, 2005

By Bob Davis

Back in November I suffered through the San Diego-to-Los Angeles commuter traffic to see many of the new software products and gadgets being shown at the 2004 International Association of Chiefs of Police Conference. One product that caught my eye was i2 Inc.’s new Visual Notebook, an electronic “storyboard” that investigators can use to visualize, analyze, and present the complexities of any incident.

Tags: Software, i2, IACP
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